Author Topic: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often  (Read 42865 times)

Dayjo

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #30 on: November 13, 2016, 01:12:52 PM »
I am happy with my digital gauge.  Similar to this one..... http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2016-NEW-LCD-Digital-Tyre-Air-Pressure-Gauge-PSI-Tester-Tool-For-Auto-Car-Motorc-/182203086368?hash=item2a6c267620:g:qR8AAOSw5cNYExDn

For a truly accurate gauge, you need to go industrial. Not worth it, in my opinion......
David.
Drive them 'til the roads wear out.......

Skyrider

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mikebore

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #32 on: November 13, 2016, 03:50:51 PM »
This any help?

http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/accessories-tyres/85474/best-tyre-pressure-gauge-2016-group-test

Thanks. I have ordered two of the RaceX (one for each car). I like the fact it has been top rated for ten years. Will be interesting to see if the two gauges give the same reading.

mikebore

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #33 on: November 14, 2016, 09:15:21 PM »
This any help?

http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/accessories-tyres/85474/best-tyre-pressure-gauge-2016-group-test

Thanks. I have ordered two of the RaceX (one for each car). I like the fact it has been top rated for ten years. Will be interesting to see if the two gauges give the same reading.

They arrived today and I am very impressed. Very solid metal body, easy to use without air escaping, clear dial with 1psi divisions, release valve to reduce pressure. Both instruments measured within 0.5 psi off each other. Each instrument has a unique serial number. The only negative is the case it comes which I find difficult to open, and will be replacing.

http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/accessories-tyres/93915/racex-tyre-gauge-rx0014

andruec

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #34 on: November 26, 2016, 08:24:49 PM »
Mine went off tonight as I was driving down the A34. Car feels fine, fuel consumption is good (60mpg displayed at journey's end). I'd just filled up with fuel so when reached my destination I reset it. Driving back, after ten minutes it went off again. Car still feels fine.

I'll check the tyres in the morning but the manual says it needs 30 minutes of driving to calibrate whereas mine claims it calibrates immediately.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2016, 08:55:47 PM by andruec »

mikebore

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #35 on: November 26, 2016, 09:08:56 PM »
I agree the process does seem somewhat misleading. As you say it says completed immediately when you instruct a calibration, but the manual says 30 minutes driving . I have been assuming that "completed" means "instructed".

Deeps and I have both had warnings shortly after doing a calibration....I suppose the calibration must fail for some reason.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2016, 09:13:32 PM by mikebore »

John Ratsey

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #36 on: November 26, 2016, 09:13:46 PM »
It's probable that distance is the key ingredient. 30 minutes of urban driving may barely provide enough miles for the system to figure out the relative rotation speeds of the different wheels (the tyres may all have different amounts of wear) but maybe 10 minutes along an open road is enough.

andruec

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #37 on: November 26, 2016, 09:30:16 PM »
Mine went off after about ten minutes driving back along the A34 at 60mph so it's likely it had enough time to calibrate. What puzzles me is if it went off again so soon after calibration that ought to mean it was deflating rapidly, oughtn't it?

The tyres are too warm to check right now but based on handling and fuel consumption I haven't noticed anything. Fuel consumption was slightly worse coming back but having just filled up on the outbound journey I don't think much can be read into a reported difference of 2mpg. Abingdon is 100 metres lower than Brackley so it's probably just that (in-joke amongst my friends).

Actually although the altitude thing is a joke it is actually true and on several journeys me and friends have noticed that fuel consumption heading south is generally better than when we head north. One other silly theory we have is that the Earth's rotation tends to lighten the vehicle as you get nearer to the equator :D

John Ratsey

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #38 on: November 26, 2016, 10:38:43 PM »
If you notice one tyre looking soft in the morning then we know that TPMS actually works! If all the tyres are looking OK then I would try another recalibration.

Given that there was a bit of an NE wind today I would expect the north-bound leg of the journey to be noticeably worse for fuel consumption. A 10 mph headwind mean that 60 mph has the wind resistance of 70 mph while a 10 mph tail wind means there's the wind resistance of 50 mph.

andruec

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #39 on: November 27, 2016, 08:41:51 AM »
If you notice one tyre looking soft in the morning then we know that TPMS actually works! If all the tyres are looking OK then I would try another recalibration.
There were a little bit low this morning. Not flat as all were above 30psi but they all needed a boost and one was slightly lower than the rest. It's a cold-ish morning so that could be why the drop but it's odd that the TPMS should notice after I've been driving for so long. Tyre temps should have corrected that. Unless that's why it takes time to calibrate of course.

Anyway no flat but I'll say that the TPMS warning was appropriate in this instance :)
Quote
Given that there was a bit of an NE wind today I would expect the north-bound leg of the journey to be noticeably worse for fuel consumption. A 10 mph headwind mean that 60 mph has the wind resistance of 70 mph while a 10 mph tail wind means there's the wind resistance of 50 mph.
Good point. Anyway we'll see how it goes today. I have a twenty mile round trip to a golf course then the same trip as last night.

On the subject of inflating tyres - why the *bleep* to compressors have screw fittings these days? What happened to the good ol' lever connection? You can't help but let some of the air out with a screw fitting. I'm off to see if someone has produced an adaptor.

John Ratsey

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #40 on: November 27, 2016, 09:01:33 AM »
On the subject of inflating tyres - why the *bleep* to compressors have screw fittings these days? What happened to the good ol' lever connection? You can't help but let some of the air out with a screw fitting. I'm off to see if someone has produced an adaptor.
Out of habit I use a foot pump, which has the lever connector, for topping up the tyres. However, I've found that the rubber inside the connector wears / perishes with time and recently had to replace my old foot pump because it was no longer reliably clamping onto the valve and would jump off when I started pumping.

andruec

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #41 on: November 27, 2016, 09:04:21 AM »
On the subject of inflating tyres - why the *bleep* to compressors have screw fittings these days? What happened to the good ol' lever connection? You can't help but let some of the air out with a screw fitting. I'm off to see if someone has produced an adaptor.
Out of habit I use a foot pump, which has the lever connector, for topping up the tyres. However, I've found that the rubber inside the connector wears / perishes with time and recently had to replace my old foot pump because it was no longer reliably clamping onto the valve and would jump off when I started pumping.
Well I can't find any adaptors but it's still possible to buy a compressor with a lever connector if you're careful so I've bought a new compressor. I suppose ought to keep a foot pump for when the compressor fails but as I'll now have three of those I think I'm covered :)

ColinB

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #42 on: November 27, 2016, 09:21:43 AM »
However, I've found that the rubber inside the connector wears / perishes with time and recently had to replace my old foot pump because it was no longer reliably clamping onto the valve and would jump off when I started pumping.
Well I can't find any adaptors
There's no need to buy a complete new pump or compressor, I had the same problem and found this to be widely available in a certain well-known accessories emporium:
http://www.halfords.com/workshop-tools/garage-equipment/breakdown-essentials/halfords-thumb-lock-tyre-valve-connector
Straightforward to fit ... cut off the old adaptor, insert the new one, tighten the jubilee clip. No problems after around a year of (occasional) use.

culzean

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #43 on: November 27, 2016, 09:36:01 AM »
On the subject of inflating tyres - why the *bleep* to compressors have screw fittings these days? What happened to the good ol' lever connection? You can't help but let some of the air out with a screw fitting. I'm off to see if someone has produced an adaptor.

I actually find the screw on connectors easier to use and more positive in their action,  IMHO lever connectors are fiddly and a bit hit and miss,  you either get a good one or one that is never gonna work reliably.  I find you lose a lot less air on a screw one if you pull the pipe back as you screw it on and off, this means that the centre of the valve is not pushed down until the connector is pretty much fully on,  and is released as early as possible when you screw it off - a teaspooon of air (5ml) in the volume of the tyre is neither here or there.  I have thrown pumps with lever connectors away in disgust in the past when I got fed up of fiddling with them to get a good connection (and not all have been cheap ones).  I had to replace the hose on my double barreled Michelin foot pump last year,  I went to local motor factor and got a length of clear braided fuel hose, re-used the original (screw on) end.

I have rarely had the TPMS trigger on either Jazzes or Civic,  only once after new tyres on one axle and again after one tyre lost 5psi - no problem with changing from Summer to winter tyres and back either, never had it trigger when I do that.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2016, 09:46:57 AM by culzean »
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

culzean

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Re: Tyre Pressure warnings....danger of crying wolf too often
« Reply #44 on: November 27, 2016, 09:43:13 AM »
Given that there was a bit of an NE wind today I would expect the north-bound leg of the journey to be noticeably worse for fuel consumption. A 10 mph headwind mean that 60 mph has the wind resistance of 70 mph while a 10 mph tail wind means there's the wind resistance of 50 mph.

And also wind resistance is proportional to square of your speed,  which means a headwind takes away more than a tailwind can give you back (if they are both equal in strength) :-X
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

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