Author Topic: drive belt  (Read 1402 times)

JazzyB

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drive belt
« on: September 03, 2017, 02:59:49 PM »
Gonna be replacing the drive belt soon. Anyone done this and any problems? Seems straight forward enough according to the Haynes bible.............


culzean

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2017, 03:14:18 PM »
Gonna be replacing the drive belt soon. Anyone done this and any problems? Seems straight forward enough according to the Haynes bible.............

I did it on a couple of GD at 50,000 miles as I assumed belt had limited life, when I went at 100K to Honda dealer to buy another the service guy asked if belt was cracked or badly frayed, he said they last a long time and they only replace them if showing signs of cracks or fraying,  the one on his Integra had done 150K and still going.

I remember taking offside front wheel and plastic guarding off to get access, but change was easy - just slacken off alternator to release belt tension and re-tension to correct up and down movement along bottom run which I think is longest run if aircon fitted  (if no aircon I think longest belt length is front run because that is where aircon pulley would be) , do not overtighten as no stretch in the belt (Kevlar cords in polyurethane) and being too tight will destroy alternator bearings and other bearings in the run.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2017, 04:34:51 PM by culzean »
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JazzyB

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2017, 09:34:31 AM »
finally got it done via honda dealer, half an hour labour and belt supplied by me about 65 all in. Would of done it myself but due to weather and the need to get it done asap, popped in on my way to work.

culzean

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2017, 09:42:14 AM »
finally got it done via honda dealer, half an hour labour and belt supplied by me about 65 all in. Would of done it myself but due to weather and the need to get it done asap, popped in on my way to work.

That isn't too bad - when I bought a belt about 10 years ago for GD the belt alone was around the 50 mark.
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

JazzyB

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2017, 09:46:33 AM »
well the belt from Honda was approx 50 but I bought a blueprint one for about 11.

The Honda guy said the Honda one would be fives times better when I questioned the cost...........yeah right....

culzean

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2017, 10:03:09 AM »
well the belt from Honda was approx 50 but I bought a blueprint one for about 11.

The Honda guy said the Honda one would be fives times better when I questioned the cost...........yeah right....

Well I suppose it is not an important bit of the car :-X  Obviously you will have no comeback on Honda if belt fails. 

I used to be engineering manager in an automated warehouse with loads of conveyors driven by basically the same microV belt that car makers use - the best belts were Kevlar and polyurethane and cost about twice as much as a lower quality belt - we had problems with Continental Contitech belts and stopped using them (extra cost of of good quality belts was dwarfed by the cost and inconvenience of the failure of a belt at peak times).
« Last Edit: September 20, 2017, 01:03:24 PM by culzean »
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

jonathan

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2017, 01:41:59 PM »
Personally, I wouldn't scrimp on cost on a high friction moving part, drive belt, that controls lots of parts of an expensive engine...

Jocko

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2017, 02:00:20 PM »
It's basically only a glorified fan belt. Not as if it is a timing belt we are talking about. Provided it is checked at service intervals, and changed as soon as it starts to show signs of deterioration, there should be no problems. In the worst case scenario, just as likely to happen with an OEM belt, and it snaps, you will just be stuck at the side of the road. Unless you try and drive on without the water pump running, there will be no damage to the engine.
Unfortunately, with a toothed belt, you cannot use the other-half's tights. Not like you could for a broken Vee belt.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2017, 02:02:42 PM by Jocko »

culzean

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2017, 02:25:08 PM »
In the worst case scenario, just as likely to happen with an OEM belt, and it snaps, you will just be stuck at the side of the road.

Auxiliary drive belt is a micro-V belt, very flat profile to allow sharp bending radius without stressing the belt and multiple small 'V' profiles running along length of the belt (parallel to sides) to give larger contact area on the pulley grooves.

As the parts / service manager at our local Honda dealer said (when I wanted to buy a belt,  he told me no need to unless my belt was visibly damaged, so he lost a sale), his aux belt on an Integra had done 150,000 miles and still good, with no visible wear (cracking, splitting or fraying).  There is no fixed replacement mileage or time, just a regular inspection of condition,  but that is their OEM belt.  When you fit a generic belt no such criteria exist, and believe me not all belts are created equal as I quickly found out, and you can't even rely on a (reputedly) good maker like Continental (German technology Ja !).

I am definitely of the opinion that 'if you buy cheap you buy twice' and have an aversion to standing at the side of the road in the rain waiting for AA or RAC to turn up because of a bad quality part I fitted.
« Last Edit: September 21, 2017, 07:59:39 AM by culzean »
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

zemax

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2017, 12:06:47 AM »
I got a conti belt as well when the original was fried after 10years of use , conti lasted about 1.5year...
Of course don't spend $50 on a honda belt, but just avoid the super super chinese ones OR  continental... :D


sparky Paul

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2017, 08:55:26 AM »
Conti do seem to be variable when read around some of the experiences on other forums.

Gates belts take some beating, they seem to last cars out.

Jocko

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #11 on: September 21, 2017, 09:33:42 AM »
It is Gates that I use, as they are the parts sold by the company I work with. Staff discount works for me!

auntyneddy

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #12 on: September 21, 2017, 02:20:35 PM »
By all accounts Gates are well respected by the trade. Certainly when the THREE timing belts on our Rover V6 had to be replaced I was recommended Gates AND they were cheaper than the Rover originals.  Don't moan about 50 for an auxillary drive belt and it's life.
Our old Rover when it came to replacing the timing belts a conservative estimate for the job was a few quid shy of 1000. Probably one of the killers of the car. I was fortunate and a local bloke did the lot for under 380 including parts. The auxillary drive belt was a pig to do as well.

Brendan976

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #13 on: August 10, 2018, 08:21:05 PM »
Hi,
I know that this thread is old but I thought I would add, I am on the original belt on my 2004 idsi cvt with 100000 miles and still no sign of wear. This is one of the few things I would pay for original Honda belt prices.
Ben

Izzy

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Re: drive belt
« Reply #14 on: August 13, 2018, 09:27:43 PM »
My car is a 58 plate Jazz with 18840 gen miles on the clock and yes the belt was frayed on one side (about 1 inch ) it was only as I was being nosey looking down the os of the engine/chassis that I noticed the frayed belt as the engine only stops in two positions so it is quite difficult to see any damage with out turning the engine over by hand and watching the belt.
 I did notice that the belt was flush with the pulleys which tells me the belt was worn. I did change it my self the only part I found difficult was getting the under wing plastic clips out always do a drawing of the belt route before you take it off than you will be sure to get it right on rebuild.

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