Author Topic: Electric cars  (Read 136094 times)

Jocko

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1605 on: November 16, 2020, 06:48:26 PM »
We'll sell you water too.

sparky Paul

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1606 on: November 16, 2020, 08:13:09 PM »
We'll sell you water too.

We've got plenty of that already, and it's only November  :(

JimSh

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1607 on: November 16, 2020, 11:26:14 PM »


Don't worry Jim, when independence comes, you'll be able to sell it to us... and add a bit on to make up for the oil.

Will fit switch to cut off in event of non-payment.

Jocko

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1608 on: November 17, 2020, 06:52:51 AM »
I see Tesla will join the S&P 500 in December, edging out J P Morgan Chase.

JimSh

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John Ratsey

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1610 on: November 18, 2020, 02:37:27 PM »
I see that they propose to allow plug-in hybrids (which people often omit to plug in) until 2035 but, it appears, the self-charging hybrids won't be allowed. Given that the latter provide, for most users, a 20% or more improvement in fuel economy they are an attractive intermediate solution.

There still seems to be a big hole in the electricity generation capacity on a dull and calm winter's day until such time that there is sufficient new nuclear capacity to provide for such events. Then, given that nuclear is best left running except for the periodic inspection and maintenance, it's likely to result in a load of excess wind capacity on the days when the wind is blowing.

Of course, the other use for all those EVs with big batteries is to act as electricity storage. A fully-charged large EV battery could supply basic houseold needs for several days (although the heat pumps will change the energy requirement). It just needs to car manufacturers to build in a 230V socket for taking power from the car.

Jocko

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1611 on: November 18, 2020, 02:48:08 PM »
230V socket for taking power from the car.
The Honda e has just such a thing.

Jocko

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1612 on: November 18, 2020, 02:56:50 PM »
Rolls Royce plan to build up to 16 mini-nuclear plants over the next five years. Each plant would produce 440 megawatts of electricity.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-54703204

ColinB

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1613 on: November 18, 2020, 04:55:56 PM »
I see that they propose to allow plug-in hybrids (which people often omit to plug in) until 2035 but, it appears, the self-charging hybrids won't be allowed. 

The bizarre thing about this is that PHEVs are not particularly environmentally friendly, see this: www.bbc.com/news/amp/science-environment-54170207
One reason is that they are rarely plugged in, so most of the time they lug heavy batteries around unnecessarily. And when they do get plugged in, they p*ss off EV owners for taking a charging station that they don't really need.

John Ratsey

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1614 on: November 18, 2020, 05:40:56 PM »
Rolls Royce plan to build up to 16 mini-nuclear plants over the next five years. Each plant would produce 440 megawatts of electricity.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-54703204
The important words in that article are "The consortium says the first of these modular plants could be up and running in 10 years, after that it will be able to build and install two a year.".  ie we'll be lucky to see the first one producing electricity by 2030.

Also to note: "Six of the UK's seven nuclear reactor sites are due to go offline by 2030 and the remaining one, Sizewell B, is due to be decommissioned in 2035." However, Hinkley Point C might be producing electricity by 2025 but the builders don't seem to have a published completion date https://www.edfenergy.com/energy/nuclear-new-build-projects/hinkley-point-c/about .

Kenneve

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1615 on: November 18, 2020, 06:52:53 PM »
16 mini nuclear plants at 440 Mw each, equals around 7 Gw (todayís nuclear output was 5.85 Gw according to Gridwatch) which will just about cover the nuclear capacity that we are to lose in the next few years. So, where is all the extra capacity going to from, to power all these cars.
I foresee power cuts galore, not that I personally will still be around to experience them!!
It seems to these are more Government proposals that havenít been thought through.

zzaj

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1616 on: November 18, 2020, 07:22:01 PM »
If my arithmetic is "approximately" correct:

 "£582 million in grants for buying electric cars" = £15 - £20 per each car on the roads today.  ???

Yes, it does seem that these are more Government proposals that really havenít been properly thought through.


Jocko

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1617 on: November 18, 2020, 07:41:03 PM »
So, where is all the extra capacity going to from, to power all these cars.
According to the National Grid, we have sufficient generating capacity. Obviously, everyone will not be able to plug their EV in at 6 pm on a January evening, but with Smart Metering and Smart Chargers, they reckon it will not be an issue.

https://www.nationalgrid.com/stories/journey-to-net-zero/5-myths-about-electric-vehicles-busted

John Ratsey

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1618 on: November 18, 2020, 08:33:44 PM »
According to the National Grid, we have sufficient generating capacity. Obviously, everyone will not be able to plug their EV in at 6 pm on a January evening, but with Smart Metering and Smart Chargers, they reckon it will not be an issue.

https://www.nationalgrid.com/stories/journey-to-net-zero/5-myths-about-electric-vehicles-busted
But what about all the electrically-powered heat pumps to be used to warm our homes? Many of those will be turned on to coincide with the evening peak. 5 million homes each using 2kW (potentially 6 to 8 kW of heat) is 10GW of electricity. Using hydrogen (generated when there is spare wind-generated electricity) instead of gas for heating would avoid this extra load on the electricity generation.

However, if people are happy to live near the nuclear reactors then these will have a lot of spare heat at a temperature suitable for house warming. The heat is free once all the pipework has been paid for.

Jocko

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #1619 on: November 18, 2020, 08:57:22 PM »
2 kW would certainly be less than I use at present, trying to heat my flat. And heat pumps in every home will take considerably longer than everyone driving EVs. New homes may be built with them, but the uptake among homeowners will be extremely slow. Unless gas boilers are made illegal to fit the price will be exorbitant for most people. An air-source heat pump for a detached house costs between £8,000 and £16,000, supplied and fitted. For families like mine, who live in a block of flats, only communal heating would be practical. There is not a lot of heat available from a window box.

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