Author Topic: Interesting weather and using sunglasses as photo filter..  (Read 1868 times)

JRHPNG

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Interesting weather and using sunglasses as photo filter..
« on: March 26, 2016, 04:52:20 AM »
Quick trip to the park with the family..
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culzean

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Re: Interesting weather and using sunglasses as photo filter..
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2016, 08:33:08 AM »
were they polarising sunglasses ?  when I had 'proper' cameras (as opposed to point and shoot digital) i used a polarising filter to make sea bluer and clouds whiter grass greener and generally make colours more saturated - had to rotate it to get best effect - took the glare off 'non metallic' surfaces like paint and glass but not chrome.
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

JRHPNG

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Re: Interesting weather and using sunglasses as photo filter..
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2016, 09:04:33 AM »
Yep, I'll have to remember to try rotating next time
You only live once - Enjoy your life...

culzean

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Re: Interesting weather and using sunglasses as photo filter..
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2016, 10:07:33 AM »
Yep, I'll have to remember to try rotating next time

I guess sunglasses will already be set up with maximum glare filtering when they are the right way up on your face,  may be worth tilting them a little bit each way - interesting thing about polarising lenses is that if you get two pairs of polarising sunglasses and place lenses at 90 degrees to each other they go black (cut out all the light) as you twist them back into alignment the light comes back - I have used this in the past to look at solar / lunar eclipses  - I like polarising glasses for driving because even with a light yellow or brown tint they cut out lots of glare - problem is they can make rainbows on the surface of or darken the LCD displays in the car.  with older cars with 'toughened glass' windscreens instead of laminated glass they did show up the patterns in the glass,  could be quite distracting.

grey tinted ones best for photography as colour is neutral,  other colours will result in tinting of the final photo (colour cast).
« Last Edit: March 26, 2016, 10:23:29 AM by culzean »
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

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