Author Topic: Wheel Arches  (Read 474 times)

hemming

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Wheel Arches
« on: December 18, 2020, 02:40:44 PM »
Following on from Jocko's scrape I have been thinking about trying to pre-empt the rusting behind the bent in rear arches.
I was considering a thorough clean followed by infilling at a 45 degree angle from the edge of the bent in arch with a bodywork filler.
Anyone have any thoughts, better ideas or alternative materials to be used please?
Apologies if this has been dealt with before.

JimSh

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Re: Wheel Arches
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2020, 03:06:21 PM »
If you don't get a perfect finish water can get trapped behind it and you will be worse than when you started.The 2004 Civic I had suffered in the same place where there was a rolled over seam. I kept it going for a few years using
"Tiger seal" to fill the gaps . Sika would do a similar job.
I think its probably better just to try to keep the wheel arches clean.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2020, 04:00:14 PM by JimSh »

Jocko

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Re: Wheel Arches
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2020, 04:20:15 PM »
What I have done in the past is clean the rear of the lip and just smeared grease behind the lip. You have to remember it is there when washing the car, though.

hemming

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Re: Wheel Arches
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2020, 05:38:36 PM »
Thanks both - good advice and possibly no coincidence it comes from Scotland?

sparky Paul

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Re: Wheel Arches
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2020, 08:27:09 PM »
Best thing I've found is Body Shutz, it's a rubberised underseal that is asphalt based and the oil in it stops rust dead. You can get it in an aerosol, but also comes in screw top cans to fit a shutz gun - this is thicker, and it's easier to paint this exactly where you want it.

Be careful with car body filler as some are porous and hold moisture.

JimSh

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Re: Wheel Arches
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2020, 08:44:17 PM »
I was using that on the Civic wheel arches too. It was designed to be sprayed but I was just painting it on.
I had actually forgotten.
Once the rust gets in however it's a losing battle.

sparky Paul

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Re: Wheel Arches
« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2020, 12:00:22 AM »
Once the rust gets in however it's a losing battle.

If you can catch it when it's just surface rust, wait until it's bone dry, wire brush the loose off and daub the shutz on. The oily shutz gets into the surface rust and should almost stop it... as well as cover it up.  ;)

However, if the corrosion is deep and the metal is rotting through, it will need a bit more attention.

TnTkr

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Re: Wheel Arches
« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2020, 09:22:33 AM »
I've made an experiment with iron oxide pigmented linseed oil paint https://www.solventfreepaint.com/ottosson-paint/iron-oxide-linseed-paint.htm. Linseed oil is very penetrating and prevents corrosion itself, and due to the the drying process is not shrinking but rather swelling the paint. Additionally the iron oxide pigment is rust preventive too. I've treated couple of rust spots on a vintage car with it, let dry for couple of weeks and oversprayed with appropritate car paint. We'll see in few years if it is any better than previous attempts with zink primer.

JimSh

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Re: Wheel Arches
« Reply #8 on: December 24, 2020, 09:30:33 AM »
Once the rust gets in however it's a losing battle.

If you can catch it when it's just surface rust, wait until it's bone dry, wire brush the loose off and daub the shutz on. The oily shutz gets into the surface rust and should almost stop it... as well as cover it up.  ;)

However, if the corrosion is deep and the metal is rotting through, it will need a bit more attention.
I found it only lasted one winter. Repeated for about 3. and then admitted I was getting too old to be scrabbling about under cars.

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