Author Topic: MOT failure  (Read 781 times)

u587162

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Re: MOT failure
« Reply #15 on: November 15, 2020, 01:53:27 AM »
Binding with the hand braked off means itís not partially engaged pressing against the discs right?

sparky Paul

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Re: MOT failure
« Reply #16 on: November 15, 2020, 10:56:40 AM »
Binding means that the brake is still applying with the handbrake, or indeed service brake, fully released. Usually as a result of a sticking piston, seizing slider pin/s or pads tight in the carrier.

Usual issue with these Jazz brakes is rust scale on the caliper carriers where the pads locate. The scale must be meticulously removed before reassembly, or the pads will jam.

Westy36

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sparky Paul

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Re: MOT failure
« Reply #18 on: November 15, 2020, 03:04:29 PM »
I find the best tool to clean up the surfaces is the gentle use of a proper flat engineer's scraper, followed by a bit of emery. The scale that develops on the caliper carrier surface can be very hard and difficult to remove, especially with a wire brush.

Because it is so hard, it's easy to think you are down to the metal when you are still working through the scale. Once it is clean, the surface should be perfectly flat and the colour should be of bright cast metal, not dull dark grey or brownish, and you should be able to see the milled finish.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2020, 03:26:31 PM by sparky Paul »

pennpeel

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Re: MOT failure
« Reply #19 on: November 15, 2020, 06:58:05 PM »
I've just had a similar expierence, with my Mk2 I bit the bullet replaced callipers, discs and pads. Took it back to the mot station who found no difference on the parking brake. Turned out the handbrake cable was stretched on the o/s and the calliper was faulty even though it was faulty. No end of problems trying to return it. So the garage Fitted another one. Ordered a new handbrake cable which wouldn't fit and they couldn't get another part direct from Honda, so that was 193 pounds, plus another calliper so quite expensive in the end. The only real expense since we've had it so not to bad in the long run.

As the company involved wouldn't replace the faulty calliper or accept the discs back that didn't fit. I found out you can contact your debit/ credit card company for a refund. It's not legally as its under 100 pounds but they will review my case and may get my money back. So worth a try if you have problems under a 100. Over a hundred pounds you have more legal rights. Just thought I'd mention it.

u587162

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Re: MOT failure
« Reply #20 on: November 19, 2020, 12:34:08 AM »
retest failed for a third time, ££460 down plus mot fee, brake pads and discs, changed twice now in a week, both callipers changed, both side hand brake cable changed and carrier changed (used carrier) and parking brake reading still giving a low reading of below 100 on the right offside.  The garage where I got the word done "sorted out the MOT" for me so I never went back to the original MOT test centre even though I was still offered one more free retest.

I've lost so many hours on this, Im just hoping the hand brake cable beds in a bit better in the weeks ahead. 

Thanks for all the comments.

Westy36

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Re: MOT failure
« Reply #21 on: November 19, 2020, 01:17:18 AM »
retest failed for a third time, ££460 down plus mot fee, brake pads and discs, changed twice now in a week, both callipers changed, both side hand brake cable changed and carrier changed (used carrier) and parking brake reading still giving a low reading of below 100 on the right offside.  The garage where I got the word done "sorted out the MOT" for me so I never went back to the original MOT test centre even though I was still offered one more free retest.

I've lost so many hours on this, Im just hoping the hand brake cable beds in a bit better in the weeks ahead. 

Thanks for all the comments.

Sorry to hear of your problems and expense. FWIW I replaced the rear discs and pads on my car very recently. Forum posts said that the handrake will bed in, and I am pleased to report that this has happened. The handbrake bites 3 clicks sooner after 200 miles than it did after replacement and is now back to where it was before!  :D The forum also advised only applying the handbrake with your foot on the brake pedal. I now do the without fail.

sparky Paul

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Re: MOT failure
« Reply #22 on: November 19, 2020, 09:43:16 AM »
retest failed for a third time, ££460 down plus mot fee, brake pads and discs, changed twice now in a week, both callipers changed, both side hand brake cable changed and carrier changed (used carrier) and parking brake reading still giving a low reading of below 100 on the right offside.

Everything changed and you still have handbrake imbalance? The handbrake doesn't have to be fantastic to pass an MOT, just even. It should be possible to pass with all new components, before bedding in. Not wanting to sound too critical of your mechanic, but there's something hasn't been done right somewhere. Assuming the service brake results are good, and showing no imbalance, the problem must be with the actuation of the handbrake.

I would be slacking the cables off, reset the caliper handbrake adjusters with the footbrake, then readjust the handbrake cables. This is the correct procedure, if it's not been done this way, you can end up with the actuator on one side not fully retracting, and this does not allow the caliper's internal automatic adjuster to work, giving a weak handbrake on one side.

Observing the cable adjuster and caliper handbrake actuators whilst pulling the handbrake on can give you a pointer - if one actuator rotates noticeably more that the other side, that caliper hasn't adjusted internally, and the cable adjuster will pull over to that side.

Some people fit new rear calipers thinking that they will slot straight in and work - you may get away with it, but you may not... the correct procedure is as above.

There can't be many other options left.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2020, 10:22:06 AM by sparky Paul »

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