Author Topic: Real Mk1 Jazz (AA)  (Read 599 times)

sparky Paul

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  • My Honda: 2015 GG6 Jazz EX 1.4 I-VTEC / 2008 GE3 Jazz SE 1.4 i-DSI
Re: Real Mk1 Jazz (AA)
« Reply #15 on: September 18, 2020, 09:24:44 AM »
I get the impression that what Wikipedia calls the 8th generation Civic https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Civic was substantially different from the 7th generation.

I don't dispute that, some new generations of cars are very substantial revisions. However, the cars are rarely completely new, there are usually some engineering solutions carried over, the basic floorpan layout, and often some major mechanical components. The Civic timeline was further complicated by the deviation of 6th/7th generation onwards Swindon produced cars from RoW Civics.

I would think the Honda City/Logo had as much in common with a Toyota Starlet as it has with the GD Jazz. If you look at the GD floorpan in particular, the layout was completely different to anything before it, and this novel chassis layout has been carried right through to the final petrol models.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2020, 09:26:21 AM by sparky Paul »

culzean

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Re: Real Mk1 Jazz (AA)
« Reply #16 on: September 18, 2020, 10:10:21 AM »
I get the impression that what Wikipedia calls the 8th generation Civic https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Civic was substantially different from the 7th generation.

I don't dispute that, some new generations of cars are very substantial revisions. However, the cars are rarely completely new, there are usually some engineering solutions carried over, the basic floorpan layout, and often some major mechanical components. The Civic timeline was further complicated by the deviation of 6th/7th generation onwards Swindon produced cars from RoW Civics.

I would think the Honda City/Logo had as much in common with a Toyota Starlet as it has with the GD Jazz. If you look at the GD floorpan in particular, the layout was completely different to anything before it, and this novel chassis layout has been carried right through to the final petrol models.

I agree,  the floorpan is the most difficult bit to engineer,  followed by the passenger cabin, that is why most facelifts happen to tailgate / boot and bonnet area.   Honda Logo did have more than a touch of Toyota Starlet about it.

The Civic has been in continuous production since 1972 with same name, My 'Rover 400' Honda Civic 6th gen was a very well built car,  double unequal wishbone suspension and a lovely bulletproof 16 valve VTEC engine ( that did not suffer from the lack of of lowdown grunt that of later VTECs ) and just ticking over at <2500 revs at 70mph.  The tyres on that Civic always wore completely evenly ( as measured with digital  caliper ) and held the road really well,  Changed the rear brake shoes at 120,000 miles on the way to 190,000 mileage under my ownership  -  cambelt every 60,000,  and MPG was good.  Looking at later Civic models the engineering has changed with most things made more cheaply ( which really had to happen to keep prices within limits due to increasing cost of safety kit,emissions gear and other tech ) , and one way to get the legendary Honda interior space ( man maximum, machine minimum ) is torsion beam rear suspension,  which is pretty crude really.
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

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