Author Topic: Jazz se sport  (Read 715 times)

Wilderbeest

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Jazz se sport
« on: September 14, 2020, 02:45:20 PM »
Hi All , I have owned my 05 sport for nine years . I regard it as a mate , its been so reliable. Its toured Europe , going to many F1 Races.  Holidays , fishing trips , its done everything.
The gearbox output bearings  went at 130000 miles.  But just before it was fitted  , the EML came on .
Code reader signified EGR Valve . So , I bought a new one . Then it came on again. This time a mechanic plugged in a 'proper' code reader , oxy sensors. Fitted two new ones . Eml light came on.  New filters ,plugs , Oil . 97 octane fuel.
EML comes on . Idle perfect . good mpg , power good !

Any ideas , before I burn it?

Jazzmeister

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2020, 04:08:31 PM »
Get a decent mechanic that doesn't throw parts at a problem.

What range of errors can the code you got be caused by?
Often a code may only be a secondary issue caused by something else.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2020, 04:11:27 PM by Jazzmeister »

Wilderbeest

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2020, 11:36:47 PM »
I have tried everyone , but Honda themselves.   The code is always the same EGR Valve P0401.
I am baffled , as all the other on board systems have been checked out , and proved to be ok.
Cat, Mass airflow sensor cleaned, throttle body removed and cleaned,. Petrol cap seal checked, and on and on.
I refuse to go to Honda, and pay them more than the old girl is worth.

Jocko

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2020, 07:14:36 AM »
The error code P0401 most likely means that one or more of the following has happened:

The DPFE or also known as differential pressure feedback EGR sensor needs to be completely replaced or it is faulty.
There is a blockage in the EGR tube
The EGR valve is faulty
The EGR valve many not be opening due to lack of vacuum.
Restricted or clogged EGR passages
The EGR valve stuck closed
Problems with DPFE sensor and hoses
Clogged catalytic converter
Carboned up EGR temperature sensor
Engine computer issues and problems
Electrical problems with EGR valve control circuit
Vacuum supply problem at the vacuum operated EGR valve


I would check that the wiring to the EGR is sound and if you can, is it getting an "On" signal.

Wilderbeest

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2020, 09:44:43 PM »
Hi , Yes thanks for that , the EGR Valve has been replaced with a brand new (German) unit. the egr passages have been de-coked , the vacuum pipes have been taken off plugged and pressure tested.
The cat has been analysed, by computer , and had an infra red temp sensor taking temps at either end, and all seems well.
I will look into this DPFE sensor , if I can find it.

Jazzmeister

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2020, 11:19:24 AM »
Hi , Yes thanks for that , the EGR Valve has been replaced with a brand new (German) unit. the egr passages have been de-coked , the vacuum pipes have been taken off plugged and pressure tested.
The cat has been analysed, by computer , and had an infra red temp sensor taking temps at either end, and all seems well.
I will look into this DPFE sensor , if I can find it.
Try cleaning the plug into the sensor because if the connection is bad the added resistance will affect the output of the sensor and may cause the error.

Also how old is your battery, older batteries that are on the way out can cause random sensor issues.

Wilderbeest

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2020, 01:46:10 PM »
The battery is nearly new ,(march), the connector is fine. I have been given the number of a 'Honda specialist' , who told me " Yes this is common on high mileage Jazz's " , "the inlet manifold will be blocked with carbon deposits" restricting recycled gas flow". To inspect  and clean it (apparently it needs to be hoovered out so the deposits don'T enter the engine and ruin it) 165 plus VAT :o
Any of you chaps heard of this?

madasafish

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2020, 03:16:58 PM »
It's common with diesels and happens on petrol engine driven largely short distances.

I cleaned the inlet manifold of our 2003 Yaris Diesel...  the effective diameter was reduced by 50% by carbon build up...

(a lengthy and messy business)

sparky Paul

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2020, 03:32:12 PM »

Jazzmeister

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2020, 01:21:15 PM »
The battery is nearly new ,(march), the connector is fine. I have been given the number of a 'Honda specialist' , who told me " Yes this is common on high mileage Jazz's " , "the inlet manifold will be blocked with carbon deposits" restricting recycled gas flow". To inspect  and clean it (apparently it needs to be hoovered out so the deposits don'T enter the engine and ruin it) 165 plus VAT :o
Any of you chaps heard of this?
That doesn't sound right, heavy carbon buildup in the intakes sufficient to cause issues on a petrol engine only really started with the introduction of direct injection engines and in terms of the Honda Jazz that was from 2015 with the Mk3.

equaliser

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2020, 06:49:06 PM »
The battery is nearly new ,(march), the connector is fine. I have been given the number of a 'Honda specialist' , who told me " Yes this is common on high mileage Jazz's " , "the inlet manifold will be blocked with carbon deposits" restricting recycled gas flow". To inspect  and clean it (apparently it needs to be hoovered out so the deposits don'T enter the engine and ruin it) 165 plus VAT :o
Any of you chaps heard of this?
That doesn't sound right, heavy carbon buildup in the intakes sufficient to cause issues on a petrol engine only really started with the introduction of direct injection engines and in terms of the Honda Jazz that was from 2015 with the Mk3.
It's the exhaust gas recirculation circuit that causes the carbon build-up. Exhaust gases are fed into the inlet manifold to help lower the combustion temperatures which lowers the NOx output. The EGR valve controls this behaviour, it's normally open to allow exhaust gases in during part-throttle loads and closed under idle and full throttle hence cars which seldom see high engine speeds suffer from more build-up of carbon deposits. There was a photo of the inlet manifold covered in carbon deposits on the forum recently.

Jazzmeister

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #11 on: September 26, 2020, 01:08:44 PM »
The battery is nearly new ,(march), the connector is fine. I have been given the number of a 'Honda specialist' , who told me " Yes this is common on high mileage Jazz's " , "the inlet manifold will be blocked with carbon deposits" restricting recycled gas flow". To inspect  and clean it (apparently it needs to be hoovered out so the deposits don'T enter the engine and ruin it) 165 plus VAT :o
Any of you chaps heard of this?
That doesn't sound right, heavy carbon buildup in the intakes sufficient to cause issues on a petrol engine only really started with the introduction of direct injection engines and in terms of the Honda Jazz that was from 2015 with the Mk3.
It's the exhaust gas recirculation circuit that causes the carbon build-up. Exhaust gases are fed into the inlet manifold to help lower the combustion temperatures which lowers the NOx output. The EGR valve controls this behaviour, it's normally open to allow exhaust gases in during part-throttle loads and closed under idle and full throttle hence cars which seldom see high engine speeds suffer from more build-up of carbon deposits. There was a photo of the inlet manifold covered in carbon deposits on the forum recently.
I've heard of an egr getting blocked but as far as I understand if the EGR system is otherwise working fine it's not going to carbon up the intake much.
It's the oil vapour from the pcv that cause the buildup.

Your PCV could be malfunctioning and introducing large amounts of oil into the intake.

Jazzmeister

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #12 on: September 26, 2020, 01:10:54 PM »
Whatever the case may be I'd try get a borescope camera off Amazon or eBay, they are cheap and work well.

Find the easiest way to send that into the intake manifold and see what's what down there for yourself, mechanics will throw labour and parts at a problem until something works and let you pay for it. You won't know if it's carbon build up until you pull the intake off or send a borescope camera down there.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2020, 01:13:10 PM by Jazzmeister »

Jocko

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2020, 01:15:49 PM »
Your PCV could be malfunctioning and introducing large amounts of oil into the intake.
If that was the case you should be burning large amounts of oil and aware of it, either in a smoky exhaust or falling level on stick.

If you Google "Honda Jazz carbon build up in inlet manifold" it is only an issue with DI engines. Without "Honda Jazz" all you get is DI and Diesels.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2020, 01:20:09 PM by Jocko »

Jazzmeister

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Re: Jazz se sport
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2020, 07:14:09 PM »
Your PCV could be malfunctioning and introducing large amounts of oil into the intake.
If that was the case you should be burning large amounts of oil and aware of it, either in a smoky exhaust or falling level on stick.

If you Google "Honda Jazz carbon build up in inlet manifold" it is only an issue with DI engines. Without "Honda Jazz" all you get is DI and Diesels.
Depends on how damaged the PCV system is, it may just be letting in enough excess oil to carbon up the inlet over an extended period but not be sufficient to otherwise cause noticeable issues. It's just one aspect to consider.

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