Author Topic: Going up hill  (Read 387 times)

Vinnyv

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Going up hill
« on: December 03, 2019, 02:53:12 PM »
Hi I have a Honda jazz automatic hybrid 2014 and noticed it revs high going up a steep hill . Is this right itís just been serviced only had it :3 weeks . Any one else have this ? What can I do ? Please

VicW

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Re: Going up hill
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2019, 03:03:59 PM »
The gearbox is changing down to maintain the speed going up the hill, if it didn't the car would slow down.
It's the same as in a manual gearbox when you change down to maintain speed uphill.

Vic.

Jocko

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Re: Going up hill
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2019, 03:14:20 PM »
Welcome. The CVT transmission is stepless, and the engine speed just just goes up as the transmission slips to a lower ratio. Sounds like a slipping clutch on a manual, but it is not.

jazzaro

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Re: Going up hill
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2019, 05:12:32 PM »
The gearbox is changing down to maintain the speed going up the hill, if it didn't the car would slow down.
It's the same as in a manual gearbox when you change down to maintain speed uphill.

Vic.
I agree.
Keeping the same gear the car would slow or the car would have a worse consumption, so the ECU (engine+gearbox) changes down to achieve the best condition.

peteo48

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Re: Going up hill
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2019, 10:16:53 PM »
Agree with all the above. Just takes a bit of getting used to but there is no problem here from what I can see. It's just effectively changing down to give it more torque for tackling the hill.

MartinJG

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Re: Going up hill
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2019, 01:55:19 AM »
Count yourself lucky. Anybody remember the rather eccentric rubber band driven DAF66.

Here is a wee example of DAF technology in splendid technicolour (or should that be technicolor).



Jocko

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Re: Going up hill
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2019, 09:05:18 AM »
We had a few milling machines that used this system for speed control of the cutting head. It was controlled manually, with a hand wheel on the outside of the head. Worked very successfully and was very reliable in that situation.

Downsizer

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Re: Going up hill
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2019, 10:04:15 AM »
Count yourself lucky. Anybody remember the rather eccentric rubber band driven DAF66.
The Honda CVT must work on the same principle, with variable diameter pulleys and a belt, though I've not seen one.  But the Mk4 hybrid doesn't have CVT, just a single ratio direct drive when using the engine for extra power at higher speeds.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2019, 10:50:25 AM by Downsizer »

jazzaro

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Re: Going up hill
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2019, 11:09:49 AM »
The Honda CVT must work on the same principle, with variable diameter pulleys and a belt, though I've not seen one.  But the Mk4 hybrid doesn't have CVT, just a single ratio direct drive when using the engine for extra power at higher speeds.
The MK4 hybrid has a CVT, not a belt or chain driven CVT but an electric CVT.

VicW

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Re: Going up hill
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2019, 02:46:23 PM »
Count yourself lucky. Anybody remember the rather eccentric rubber band driven DAF66.

I had a Daf55 while living in Scotland. There was no differential, it relied on a bit of belt slip. The traction on slippery roads was excellent. The control system was crude in that it relied on inlet manifold depression to work and the clutch was centrifugal. It used a Renault 1200 engine.
The DAF company was bought out by Volvo and I think they introduced the 66. Volvo took over the DAF dealerships and spares prices doubled. I needed a pair of drive belts and when I collected them they were in DAF plastic bags but the former price had been crossed and replaced by one at double the original.

Vic.


jazzaro

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Re: Going up hill
« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2019, 03:23:29 PM »

John Ratsey

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Re: Going up hill
« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2019, 04:56:49 PM »
The MK4 hybrid has a CVT, not a belt or chain driven CVT but an electric CVT.
A major difference being that the battery receives / supplies any difference between engine output and the power needed to move the vehicle. There's also a fixed ratio direct drive mode for cruising.

sparky Paul

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Re: Going up hill
« Reply #12 on: Today at 09:48:38 AM »
We had a few milling machines that used this system for speed control of the cutting head. It was controlled manually, with a hand wheel on the outside of the head. Worked very successfully and was very reliable in that situation.

Yes, I've seen those before on millers.

I had a bit of a soft spot for the CVT on the Volvo 340, if the belts were replaced regularly and the vacuum pipes were kept in good order, it was reliable and worked quite well. The speed was locked down to the lowest ratio in reverse on the Volvo, I seem to recall that the early DAF CVT also worked in reverse, and you could go at full pelt backwards!

Anyone that's worked in the food industry will also remember the Krones Canmatic labellers which used the same system, but an air operated pulley and everything 3+ times the size of the Volvo.

Jocko

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Re: Going up hill
« Reply #13 on: Today at 09:59:09 AM »
I seem to recall that the early DAF CVT also worked in reverse, and you could go at full pelt backwards!
That is my recollection too.

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