Author Topic: Old cars.  (Read 483 times)

Jocko

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Old cars.
« on: October 03, 2018, 06:27:16 PM »
As there seems to be plenty of us "more experienced" drivers on the forum, and a recent discussion meandered off to old cars, I thought I would start an "Old car" thread.
Of all the old cars I have owned, and there have been many, the one I would love to have now was my Wolseley 4/50. Basically a re-badged Morris Oxford, but more upmarket and expensive. Unlike the Oxford's side valve engine, this had a 4 cylinder version of the 6/80's overhead cam engine.
Mine was of 1952 vintage and was 16 years old when I bought it. Not old these days, but ancient back then.
Found this on Wiki:
A 4/50 tested by the British magazine The Motor in 1950 had a top speed of 70.7 mph and could accelerate from 0-60 mph in 30.3 seconds. A fuel consumption of 27.0 miles per gallon was recorded. The test car cost 703 including taxes.


VicW

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Re: Old cars.
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2018, 07:01:42 PM »
In 1964 I bought my first car having used a m/bike and sidecar up to then as transport fo the four of us. The car was a 1953 Vauxhall Velox that I discovered only had three wheels braked as the left rear brake had been disconnected because of a fluid leak. The Vauxhall was quickly replaced by a 1955 Standard Vanguard, a very comfortable car if a bit of a tank round corners. It had the added luxury of overdrive on the three speed gearbox.

Vic.

trebor1652

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Re: Old cars.
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2018, 07:15:33 PM »
I went from motorcycle to a BMW Isetta and then a Hillman Imp. Loved how easy it was to take the engine out. Block up the engine, disconnect linkages etc, undo the rear cross member let off the handbrake and push the car away. Couldn't be simpler.
Over head camshaft with buckets and shims. Would love to get my hands on one to do up.

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« Last Edit: October 03, 2018, 09:03:32 PM by trebor1652 »

Jocko

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Re: Old cars.
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2018, 08:03:16 PM »
I went down the Hillman Imp route too. Rebuilt a couple of engines. Playing with the shims was a PIA. Last one I got was converted into a stock rod. Never knew there was so much involved in stripping out a car!


peteo48

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Re: Old cars.
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2018, 10:19:22 PM »
My first car was a 1954 (I think) Ford Anglia bought from a colleague in my first job in 1970 so it was 16 years old. It was the old boxy shape more commonly associated with the Popular and the Prefect. Side valve engine which was a pig to start although you could usually get it going with the starting handle. I don't know about 0-60 - rarely got beyond 55 but it took at least a minute.

The thing that drove me mad was the vacuum operated wiper system. The faster the car went, the slower the wiper. As you came to a halt they went like the clapper. Either way you couldn't see! Had to double declutch quite a lot. Only 3 speed box.

It was a two tone paint job - black and red - and had little porthole type badges/ornaments on each front wing although I don't think these were standard.

Still think fondly of it. Every journey was an adventure. Replaced it in 1972 with a Mk1 Cortina. It was like night and day in terms of driveability.

Jocko

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Re: Old cars.
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2018, 07:42:49 AM »
I had a 1956 Ford Prefect 100E, which was a brilliant little car. Bought it for 8, waste deep in grass and with a new clutch but the gearbox not connected (failed DIY project). It sat in my garage for two years before I got round to putting it together. It always started a dream (just as well as that model didn't have a starting handle), but I had to replace the wiper drive with a salvaged mini unit.
I had a mate who was an expert sheet metal worker, and over the years he repaired the odd rough bit. I hand painted it with brushing enamel, the kind they used to paint buses and trucks.
Eventually a Bedford lorry made a right turn directly into my path, and that was that. Sold on the number plate, and it was last seen on a purple Porsche.
The photograph shows it after painting. Note the parking lamp (no roadside parking without lights back then), and the rear window demister panel. Yes, we "experienced drivers" had it tough!
There is also a shot of my modded engine bay, complete with screen jet reservoir!



VicW

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Re: Old cars.
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2018, 03:24:58 PM »
The thing that drove me mad was the vacuum operated wiper system. The faster the car went, the slower the wiper. As you came to a halt they went like the clapper. .
The wipers were fed from a vacuum tank under the bonnet that was powered by a pipe from the inlet manifold. The tank was supposed to supply a reserve of vacuum when the throttle was open wide. I cured the problem by fitting a second vacuum tank under the bonnet in series with the existing one so that there was more vacuum.
I got a fiver from 'Car Mechanics' for 'idea of the month'.

Vic.

Hobo

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Re: Old cars.
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2018, 03:48:21 PM »
First car in 1963 was an old Hillman Minx, 3 speed column change and bench front seat, horrible brownish colour (think it was called antelope) can still remember the reg. 860 BTJ, had it till the front wings started to part company with the body due to tin worm. ::)

Then a Hillman Imp they used to go through head gaskets with alarming regularity, engine out to change one I think mine used to jump out by itself it went through so many gaskets, the clue was the big cloud of black smoke that suddenly appeared to be following you. ;D
« Last Edit: October 05, 2018, 08:09:32 PM by Hobo »

sparky Paul

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Re: Old cars.
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2018, 08:06:17 PM »
That's the great thing about this forum, it's one of the few places on the internet where I don't feel old. ;D

RichardA

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Re: Old cars.
« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2018, 08:27:49 PM »
As an early Millennial I Got my license in 2001 so I can't really contribute in the same context!  ;D

I went down the Hillman Imp route too. Rebuilt a couple of engines. Playing with the shims was a PIA. Last one I got was converted into a stock rod. Never knew there was so much involved in stripping out a car!

Dad had a couple of Imps back in 60s, he was a mechanic back in day so I'll have to ask him about that.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2018, 08:29:33 PM by RichardA »

nigelr

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Re: Old cars.
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2018, 09:36:53 PM »
A car I still think about is my dad's old Ford Popular ..... it wasn't the greatest car in the world, but it was his, and like the old man himself, I still miss it.

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