Author Topic: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant  (Read 698 times)

bus_ter

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Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« on: August 28, 2018, 05:52:53 PM »
Hello,

I've recently bought a 2006 Honda Jazz and I plan to give the engine a full service. The oil looks straightforward but I have a couple quick questions about changing the coolant.

1) Do I need to remove the under tray beneath the engine? Looks like some of the clips have been broken on mine as it's held on with tie wraps in places. The Haynes manual says it needs to be removed, but it looks like there is a hole specifically placed to allow the coolant to be drained?

2) The Haynes manual says I need a new O-Ring and washer for the radiator and engine drain plugs. I can't source these anywhere. Do I really need to replace them? and if so where can I buy them?!

Thanks!

JazzyB

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2018, 09:10:32 PM »
As you said leave the tray where it is, you will be fine and o-rings and washers are freely available from any Honda car dealer.

I would replace them cause if you have a leak you will have drain all your nice coolant or oil to change it.


bus_ter

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2018, 10:40:38 PM »
Thanks for the Answers.

I'll call into my local Honda dealer tomorrow.

bus_ter

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2018, 02:09:33 PM »
So I called into my local Honda dealer hoping to pick up the parts..

Apparently my car is too old for their parts catalogue (2006) so they can't source the parts.

Asking what they do.. they don't touch the plugs and just remove a radiator hose and drain what they can  :o

So again I'm stuck. What are other owners doing when they replace the coolant? Should I attempt breaking the plug seal and hope the old O-Ring will re-seal correctly? Or use the dealers method and do a partial fluid replacement from a hose?

bus_ter

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2018, 02:22:52 PM »
So I called my second nearest dealer (bit of a trip) and asked the same question.

Totally different answer! They can order the parts in. I'll post the parts numbers below for reference:

Radiator O-Ring: 19012pd2004
Engine Coolant Plug Washer: 11107pwa300

So now I'm going to call my local Honda dealer armed with these part codes and kick off..

JazzyB

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2018, 03:06:43 PM »
I wouldn't bother with the engine block plug as it's difficult to get access. You could just remove the bottom radiator hose or do like I did remove the radiator drain plug replacing the rubber o ring.

When I last did it only a couple of litres drained so don't be surprised if not much comes out.

bus_ter

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2018, 03:17:12 PM »
Ideally I want to do the job properly. The stuff that's in there has been there an awful long time and is basically brown and devoid of all colour. A partial change probably won't even change the colour.

Do you know if both plugs can be accessed without removing the undertray? As that looks like a timely pain.

JazzyB

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2018, 03:24:12 PM »
The radiator drain is easy no need to remove the undertray

The engine one is more of a pain you defo gonna need to remove the undertray and anything else to gain access

bus_ter

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2018, 03:51:30 PM »
Well parts ordered from my local Honda dealer. They couldn't really give me an answer to why they couldn't find the parts the first time... ::)

I'll attempt to do a full coolant change. If it turns out to be too much of a hassle I'll just do a radiator drain.

I also have 8 plugs ready to go in. The front ones look easy, the rear ones look a bit tricky.

Hopefully at least the oil change will be straight forward!

culzean

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2018, 04:46:03 PM »
I use OAT (long life organic acid technology) https://www.halfords.com/motoring/engine-oils-fluids/antifreeze/halfords-oat-ready-mixed-antifreeze-5-litres.

Get the ready mixed as it takes guesswork out of mixing, 50 % is the design mix, it is bit counter-intuitive but if antifreeze is too dilute or too concentrated it will raise (not lower) the freezing point.

I have changed coolant on many cars, but I avoid unscrewing plugs from cylinder blocks as too much to go wrong and they are normally a PITA to get to. The plug could leak after it has been taken out and put back,   what are you gonna do it you strip the thread when taking it out or crossthread it when putting it back in ? Could get expensive.

 I just turn heater to cold (to block it off from main system) and drain out what wants to come out through the tap in the bottom of radiator ( no need to remove undertray) - I just drain into a tray and measure how much comes out (get some cheap plastic mearurring jugs from pound shop or similar)- Measuring what comes out means you know how much should go back in,  if you cannot get the same amount back in you probably have an airlock in system.  Put the rad cap back on and run the engine and then try to get the rest back in.  It helps if front of car is higher than the rear - I normally face our cars up our sloping driveway.

The reason for turning the heater to min temperature is to keep the old coolant in the heater in the heater radiator and stop air getting in (MK2 onwards with 'fly by wire climate control probably shut the electric powered valves / solenoids when ignition power is off anyway). 

When you are happy that the same amount went in that came out run the engine and turn heater on to circulate coolant properly. You probably change about half the coolant by this method so  I normally run the car for a few days or so and try to cover a few miles and then repeat the procedure. 
« Last Edit: August 29, 2018, 04:47:44 PM by culzean »
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

JazzyB

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2018, 05:28:19 PM »
The Honda coolant is changed from new at 10 years or x miles, I can't  remember the mileage off the top of my head and then every 5 years or x miles whichever comes first.

So yours should of been done at least at 10 years I.e 2016

What is the current mileage?

If it's got Honda coolant in it I would buy the same or if in doubt go for one the universal' mixes with all colours' ones.

Have heard of people mixing coolant's only to find a overheated engine due to the different coolants thickening and preventing flow.

sparky Paul

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2018, 05:47:02 PM »
Indeed, mixing OAT with Glycol coolant can cause gelling in the radiator.

You should lose most of the coolant from the bottom hose, a flush with a garden hosepipe should clear any remainder.

culzean

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2018, 05:55:32 PM »
OAT coolant is still based on glycol, the anti-freeze bit is still ethylene glycol (alcohol) and it keeps its antifreeze properties for a long long time,  may get diluted if system topped up with plain water though. It is the OAT anti corrosion chemicals that get used up as they do their job and you are basically replacing those.
 
Older glycol coolant used to contain silicates as the anti corrosion, but they can damage modern systems.

The colour of antifreeze does not mean much, glycol is clear and so are other additives, the colour is added to show up any leaks in the system, you can check antifreeze (glycol) concentration with a hydrometer, but not the level of anti corrosion chemicals.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2018, 05:57:51 PM by culzean »
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

sparky Paul

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2018, 06:18:47 PM »
I meant to say OAT and the old green/blue Glycol based coolant.

Personally, if in any doubt as to what's in it, I would give it a good flush.

Jocko

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Re: Couple Questions about changing the Coolant
« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2018, 06:19:58 PM »
You should lose most of the coolant from the bottom hose, a flush with a garden hosepipe should clear any remainder.
What I have done in the past is remove the bottom hose, from the block.
Once as much as wants to drain out has drained out I clamp the hose shut, remove the thermostat and flush the block from the top, using a garden hose.
Once everything is all buttoned up again I then add enough concentrated antifreeze to make a total fill at the correct ratio then fill up with water. Run the engine until warm and check the level. If it is low I top up with tap water.

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