Author Topic: Indicating protocol.  (Read 1179 times)

Jocko

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Re: Indicating protocol.
« Reply #30 on: July 10, 2018, 05:59:10 PM »
Seriously though, if there is a sign saying "Use both lanes" then I will.  That is usually in place because single file traffic is likely to back up to an obstruction, like a roundabout.
Me too. And I will happily use the outside lane myself, when so signed.

Jocko

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Re: Indicating protocol.
« Reply #31 on: July 10, 2018, 06:10:16 PM »
Merge in turn is in the highway code.

Use both lanes when queuing until the pinch point then zip merge.
This is the appropriate part.

134
You should follow the signs and road markings and get into the lane as directed. In congested road conditions do not change lanes unnecessarily. Merging in turn is recommended but only if safe and appropriate when vehicles are travelling at a very low speed, e.g. when approaching road works or a road traffic incident. It is not recommended at high speed.


There is no mention of "Use both lanes when queuing until the pinch point then zip merge", but it does say to follow the signs, and if the signs have been saying a lane is closed for a half mile or more, then I consider they have ignored the signs if they get to within 200 yards of the pinch point and still press on. Then they can take pot luck.

Ozzie

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Re: Indicating protocol.
« Reply #32 on: July 10, 2018, 09:22:48 PM »
The vehicle you have just overtaken may benefit from the signal, just so they know when you are coming back to the left.

When I was a Driving Instructor I was told by the senior examiner in Norwich when discussing signalling that indicating to pull back into the nearside lane after overtaking on a dual carriageway is unnecessary as the normal lane to drive in is the nearside lane the outside lane is for overtaking, anyone you have overtaken should be aware that you are going to return to that lane when it is safe to do so if there is no traffic in it.

and that's why he's an Examiner !  :D :D :D :D :D

ColinB

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Re: Indicating protocol.
« Reply #33 on: July 10, 2018, 10:55:25 PM »
All these dogmatic comments about ďIn situation X I always indicateĒ or ďIn situation Y I never indicateĒ are missing the point. You should be assessing the situation around you and signalling if there is a benefit in doing so.

So with regard to this ...
The vehicle you have just overtaken may benefit from the signal, just so they know when you are coming back to the left.

When I was a Driving Instructor I was told by the senior examiner in Norwich when discussing signalling that indicating to pull back into the nearside lane after overtaking on a dual carriageway is unnecessary as the normal lane to drive in is the nearside lane the outside lane is for overtaking, anyone you have overtaken should be aware that you are going to return to that lane when it is safe to do so if there is no traffic in it.

and that's why he's an Examiner !  :D :D :D :D :D
... even the ďsenior examiner in NorwichĒ isnít 100% correct, because it depends on the circumstances, for example:
- if thereís no other traffic around then heís right. Although as already stated I might signal anyway just to keep the lane departure warning quiet.
- if thereís a faster vehicle coming up behind as I complete the overtake then Iíll signal to tell him Iím moving over.
- if Iím returning to lane 2 from lane 3 after an overtake then Iíll signal so that vehicles in lane 1 are warned against moving out.

culzean

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Re: Indicating protocol.
« Reply #34 on: July 11, 2018, 07:32:54 PM »
All these dogmatic comments about “In situation X I always indicate” or “In situation Y I never indicate” are missing the point. You should be assessing the situation around you and signalling if there is a benefit in doing so.

So with regard to this ...
The vehicle you have just overtaken may benefit from the signal, just so they know when you are coming back to the left.

When I was a Driving Instructor I was told by the senior examiner in Norwich when discussing signalling that indicating to pull back into the nearside lane after overtaking on a dual carriageway is unnecessary as the normal lane to drive in is the nearside lane the outside lane is for overtaking, anyone you have overtaken should be aware that you are going to return to that lane when it is safe to do so if there is no traffic in it.

and that's why he's an Examiner !  :D :D :D :D :D
... even the “senior examiner in Norwich” isn’t 100% correct, because it depends on the circumstances, for example:
- if there’s no other traffic around then he’s right. Although as already stated I might signal anyway just to keep the lane departure warning quiet.
- if there’s a faster vehicle coming up behind as I complete the overtake then I’ll signal to tell him I’m moving over.
- if I’m returning to lane 2 from lane 3 after an overtake then I’ll signal so that vehicles in lane 1 are warned against moving out.

I 100% agree with you Colin, it all depends on prevailing conditions of traffic,  I will indicate if I am pulling into a slower lane and someone coming up faster behind me as very often it saves them having to pull into fast lane if they know you will soon be disappearing from the centre lane.  Some people still try to 'undertake' on motorways and you have to have eyes up your ar5e to make sure someone is not creeping through on the inside (some people get upset when you overtake them and speed up).   I can still remember driving is Australia when we lived there and undertaking (on the left ) don't know if it was legal but was not frowned upon like it is here and I have seen it cause some good accidents, it also made driving more stressful as you continually had to continually monitor your nearside mirror, especially when pulling back into nearside lane.
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

Jocko

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Re: Indicating protocol.
« Reply #35 on: July 11, 2018, 09:19:10 PM »
- if Iím returning to lane 2 from lane 3 after an overtake then Iíll signal so that vehicles in lane 1 are warned against moving out.
Not a problem I have, living where I do. We only have dual carriageways and two lane motorways around me. The only time we have three lanes is slip roads.

Ozzie

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Re: Indicating protocol.
« Reply #36 on: July 12, 2018, 08:21:49 PM »
The A1M near Peterborough is 4 lanes . . . . and now learners are allowed on them.
They will be signalling to change lanes, whilst I am with them at least.

Jocko

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Re: Indicating protocol.
« Reply #37 on: July 12, 2018, 09:32:40 PM »
The ADI that gave me my assessment was talking about learners on the motorway. He said he has always been taking his learners onto the A92, by us, which is 2 lane motorway with all but the hard shoulder.

RichardA

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Re: Indicating protocol.
« Reply #38 on: July 22, 2018, 11:37:56 AM »
Merge in turn is in the highway code.

Use both lanes when queuing until the pinch point then zip merge.
This is the appropriate part.

134
You should follow the signs and road markings and get into the lane as directed. In congested road conditions do not change lanes unnecessarily. Merging in turn is recommended but only if safe and appropriate when vehicles are travelling at a very low speed, e.g. when approaching road works or a road traffic incident. It is not recommended at high speed.


There is no mention of "Use both lanes when queuing until the pinch point then zip merge", but it does say to follow the signs, and if the signs have been saying a lane is closed for a half mile or more, then I consider they have ignored the signs if they get to within 200 yards of the pinch point and still press on. Then they can take pot luck.

The lane isn't closed until it's closed, the signs are a warning that the lane will close in xxx yards. If traffic is slow moving then merging further up works best.

I caught this on the dashcam at the sliproad from the M25 anti-clockwise to M23 southbound. The sliproad goes from two to one lane, traffic was queuing and people were merging in turn. I don't see why the same principle can't be adopted at roadworks, I'm sure the above rule is intended to encourage this practice where conditions allow:

(screenshot):



« Last Edit: July 22, 2018, 11:46:39 AM by RichardA »

RichardA

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Re: Indicating protocol.
« Reply #39 on: July 22, 2018, 11:44:25 AM »
It was mentioned above about German cars and the behaviour of the their drivers. I can only assume the original cut of this music video had the guy driving a 320d like a twit, only for the record company to tell him to reshoot it as somthing less appropriate: :D


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