Author Topic: Driving Assessment.  (Read 1088 times)

Jocko

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Driving Assessment.
« on: May 21, 2018, 02:10:49 PM »
As I am galloping towards my 70th birthday, I have my new 3 year licence in my wallet, I have had my eyes retested and passed as okay to drive (with my prescription lenses), so I have now arranged a 2 hour driving assessment with a local driving school.
My assessment will take place on Friday morning, it will include town, rural and motorway driving, and will be conducted in my own car. I am looking forward to it, but not without a little trepidation. I have been re-reading the Highway Code just in case I get any sneaky questions.
I'll let you know how I get on!  :o

trebor1652

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2018, 02:51:14 PM »
Good luck.
I believe you can do the same with IAM.

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk


MicktheMonster

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2018, 06:32:00 AM »
Good luck mate, have just had to do a theory test at work to keep driving their vehicles, got 92%, found a lot of the questions a bit vague but got there in the end. Last time I looked at highway code was about 20 years ago for bike test, latest version now seems to be full of stuff about emissions and fuel economy.

Jocko

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2018, 07:25:31 AM »
I had to do my Theory Test for my PCV licence, in 2006. Managed 100%, but that was after serious study, because it was all full of Tacho and driving hour questions, specific to trucks and buses. Found the basic Highway code questions difficult to get wrong, as they have not changed much since I started driving, 53 years ago.
Hazard awareness test was another thing entirely, until I started to use video game strategy on it.
I am currently doing mock theory tests, but finding them slightly more difficult now. probably more an age thing.
And what is it with braking distances. When I started driving metres hadn't been invented!

Jocko

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2018, 08:17:16 AM »
The Driving Theory Test also has First Aid questions in it now.

peteo48

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2018, 10:16:18 AM »
Look forward to your feedback Jocko. Like you I am closing on 70 (October) and I have thought of doing a similar thing myself. IAM and ROSPA do them but it looks like yours will be more extensive - think the IAM and ROSPA ones are about an hour.

Jocko

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2018, 10:27:38 AM »
The problem with IAM and ROSPA, for me, is I would have to go to them (probably Edinburgh). The driving school meets me at my garage. ROSPA is an hour for 55. Going with the driving school I get 2 hours for 40, with my own car (52 if I use the school car).

JohnAlways

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2018, 11:40:03 AM »
Hi Jocko
Do you find the Hazard Perception Test a little strange. When I looked at them I did see the tractor pull out in front of me :) which was correct but I'm not supposed to see the mud on road, blind side turning, horse etc. I saw about 5 hazards before the one I was supposed to report on. It's like stating the obvious as a hazard when after a lot of experience you see things on the road which potentially can be a hazard. I think I would find it hard because it misses so much. I have been an HGV driving assessor, an HGV Driving Instructor as well as a car driver and motorcycle rider.
The old question I used to ask "wet leaves and ice on the road, which will cause the accident?".  :)

Jocko

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2018, 04:31:11 PM »
Like you, I saw many more hazards than the ones a learner was expected to see. I also spotted the "real" hazards sooner than a learner would, and as a result would press the button too soon. I had to "train myself" to do the test like a learner.
Once you learn that the motorway scenario is about vehicles joining or changing lanes unexpectedly, the country scenario, tractors, horses round bends, water on road, town scenario, cars pulling out, pedestrians running across the road, vehicles overtaking as they approach you, you can disregard the "subtle" hazards an experienced driver spots.
Our PCV instructor told us how the four instructors all took the test when it was first introduced (tests are done from the bus depot, not from a testing centre) and all four failed the hazard perception test!

culzean

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2018, 06:47:02 PM »
Like you, I saw many more hazards than the ones a learner was expected to see. I also spotted the "real" hazards sooner than a learner would, and as a result would press the button too soon. I had to "train myself" to do the test like a learner.
Once you learn that the motorway scenario is about vehicles joining or changing lanes unexpectedly, the country scenario, tractors, horses round bends, water on road, town scenario, cars pulling out, pedestrians running across the road, vehicles overtaking as they approach you, you can disregard the "subtle" hazards an experienced driver spots.
Our PCV instructor told us how the four instructors all took the test when it was first introduced (tests are done from the bus depot, not from a testing centre) and all four failed the hazard perception test!

I used to work with an experienced car driver who wanted to get a motorbike / scooter. He was doing the online practice hazard perception tests and kept failing because he was spotting too many, he also had to train himself to only spot the ' obvious' ones, tests seem to be of limited use  :o I can understand failing if you don't spot enough hazards - but not because you spot more subtle ones, unless it is to weed out the people who randomly press the button / mouse in the hope of getting a good score.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2018, 06:55:22 PM by culzean »
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

Jocko

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #10 on: May 22, 2018, 09:19:35 PM »
unless it is to weed out the people who randomly press the button / mouse in the hope of getting a good score.
That is part of the problem. They only have a window during which you can click and be scored, but if you random click too often, you fail. I found the best way was to click when you saw the hazard, then again when it was blatantly obvious. That way you got a score, but didn't over click.
The test is not idea, but it is better than no hazard perception test at all.

richardfrost

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2018, 11:11:15 AM »
The old question I used to ask "wet leaves and ice on the road, which will cause the accident?".  :)
Speed. The answer is always speed.

Jocko

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #12 on: May 25, 2018, 01:23:02 PM »
I had my driving assessment this morning. We covered 74 miles which were composed of motorway, rural and town driving. I was driving for 2 hours exactly, and the price was 40. My assessor, an ADI with a local driving school, is also an assessor for IAM Road Smart. It was the IAM system he used to mark me. I am pleased to say I was marked Grade 1 in every category (Excellent) and as a result, Excellent overall. I am highly delighted. He said that as a passenger, it was a relaxing enjoyable drive. We had lovely weather, even if the roads were busy (Bank holiday this weekend).
The only advice he gave me was not to do huge long journeys. At 70 years of age, long drives can be exceptionally tiring, but he reckoned I have many years of driving ahead of me.

peteo48

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #13 on: May 25, 2018, 01:32:36 PM »
Congratulations!!

The advice on long drives is probably sound. I like frequent breaks. My bladder ensures that these are taken ;)

Jocko

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Re: Driving Assessment.
« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2018, 01:48:23 PM »
Got round to scanning my certificate.

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