Clubjazz - Honda Jazz & HR-V Forums

Diagnostics, Tuning, Modifications and Maintenance - all Hondas => Car Care & Detailing => Topic started by: jazzway on November 11, 2017, 08:19:03 PM

Title: Ready for the winter
Post by: jazzway on November 11, 2017, 08:19:03 PM
The last week of September i made the car's exterior ready for winter time. For people who want to protect their car extra for the winter but haven't done it yet... there still is time. :)

After a good pre-touchless wash with AW foam shampoo i washed the car with the 3 bucket method (shampoo, rinse, wheels), Carpro Reset shampoo and a microfibre wash pad. Then it was time to clay the car, followed by another wash, rinse and then dried with an extra soft microfibre towel. The last detail was in June, then the Jazz got a 2-stage polish job, therefore i only did a round cleanser polish now (D/A polisher, PBW Professional Polish, black finishing foam pad). Then after wiping down with C Eraser, the paint was as clean as possible and ready for the last step.

As last step product (LSP) i chose for Finish Kare 1000P Hi-Temp Paste Wax. FK 1000P is actually a sealant and with its durability up to 6 months and slick, almost self-cleaning finish, it makes a great LSP for the winter months. The paint got 2 layers with 3 days in between.
Windows were also polished with PB PP and the rear and side windows got a layer FK1000P, the windshield 2 layers Turte Wax Clearvue Rain Repellant. Wheels were only cleaned (they still wear FK1000P - yes, again, haha) and will be changed for the winter wheels somewhere this month. Rubber and plastics were cleaned with APC and then dressed with Finish Kare #350.

Not much images, but you get an idea, or not. ;)

(https://i.imgur.com/er3uiTe.jpg)
(https://i.imgur.com/bGH62AO.jpg)


Beading was nice.
(https://i.imgur.com/MwzgPKH.jpg)
(https://i.imgur.com/l9gdHOR.jpg)


(https://i.imgur.com/6tFT02r.jpg)
(https://i.imgur.com/NZvsIwX.jpg)

Back in June i also removed the roof trim to give both the paint underneath as the trim a good clean and protection.
(https://i.imgur.com/ppMXqaI.jpg)
(https://i.imgur.com/TrV5pRg.jpg)
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: peteo48 on November 11, 2017, 09:59:25 PM
I guess you could do both though ;D

I think I now know why your car looks so good Jazzway. I've just topped up the wax (Bilt Hamber Double Speed Wax) - never clayed a car. I remain to be convinced about clay - after all we had shiny cars long before clay. Open to persuasion though.
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: Jocko on November 11, 2017, 10:05:03 PM
I clay mine, but don't notice a great difference before and after. Even after the first time I did it.
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: 123Drive! on November 12, 2017, 12:48:52 AM
Hi Jazzway, how can you remove the roof trims please?
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: peteo48 on November 12, 2017, 12:50:36 PM
Although, when it comes to trade in time, a shiny well cared for exterior and interior will add value?

Saying that, the old boy across the road from me tells me he was an enthusiastic polisher and buffer back in the day but a bad back put paid to that. He now uses the hand wash at Tesco twice a month and I must admit his car always looks very smart. (He has got a 64 plate Civic - must be due a new one any day now!)
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: Jocko on November 12, 2017, 01:01:05 PM
In 1959 my dad had a 1939 Hillman Minx. It was black and shiny, and after 20 years the paint on the side of the bonnet had been rubbed through. It was right through the red primer coat, to the metal. The thing was, that metal never showed signs of rust. It shone like chrome!
(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/c2/9e/19/c29e19e062fa3830b1e30a4d7ffc8f22.jpg)
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: Jocko on November 12, 2017, 08:22:54 PM
When I wash my car I use two buckets. Then after the car is washed I use the wash bucket for the wheels. Do you use a third bucket just to keep the bucket itself clean? I wash the bucket out after I am done.
I would love to be able to use a D/A polisher on my paintwork. I am sure it would make a huge difference, but I have no power, living in a top storey flat!
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: TG on November 12, 2017, 09:44:11 PM
After a weekend in the sticks I scraped some of the mud off the wheel arches with my foot, it's not due a wash until April -
 hopefully get some rain before then.
--
TG
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: peteo48 on November 12, 2017, 09:59:46 PM
When I wash my car I use two buckets. Then after the car is washed I use the wash bucket for the wheels. Do you use a third bucket just to keep the bucket itself clean? I wash the bucket out after I am done.
I would love to be able to use a D/A polisher on my paintwork. I am sure it would make a huge difference, but I have no power, living in a top storey flat!

It's amazing how much grit you get in the bottom of a bucket - really noticeable when you use it again after a while and it's completely dry. Good argument for grit guards?
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: madasafish on November 13, 2017, 06:45:39 AM
I noticed when replacing rear pads , how much mud built up under the passenger side rear wheel arch around the pipes to the petrol filler cap. That is despite regular hosing underneath AND doing it the day before working on the car..I onlt wash my car every 2-4 weeks.. if I leave it outside when the weather is above 10C ,the bees decide to wax it as they poo as they climb away to go to the flowers they are foraging on.
If I was anally retentive about having a clean car, I would go insane...and bee poo cannot all be removed with a mitten or brush - fingernail job..
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: auntyneddy on November 13, 2017, 09:23:58 AM
I don't know where in the sticks you went TG but in Cornwall it's referred too as Cornish Underseal. My Neighbour now gone had a Lada and as was his want called me to look at a problem on his car while there he said to me is that a mat poking through the top of the wing???????? No I said it good old cow sh*t and steel do not like it.
TG if you dont was the car, give it a rinse off underneath, cows don't only produce methane the sloppy brown stuff is pretty corrosive.
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: madasafish on November 13, 2017, 11:48:50 AM
I use Dinitrol  on the underneath plus Supertrol on the exposed nuts and bolts.. The problem with Supertrol is it never hardens so can be washed away..

(No links so not advertising Mods!)
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: TG on November 13, 2017, 02:11:13 PM
I do actually take a bit more care of my car than I might admit to, but so long as it's got a protective coating of something over the paintwork* then I'm slightly reluctant to rub it with anything.  As mentioned above in the 2+ buckets method, anything trapped between the sponge/mitt/cloth and the paint is going to cause an issue.  I do use a hanging basket lance to rinse the underneath if needed and admire those whose dedication puts their car into 'better than showroom' condition.  My car looks OK most of the time.
--
TG

* Autoglym Super Resin Polish
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: peteo48 on November 13, 2017, 05:02:13 PM
When I wash my car I use two buckets. Then after the car is washed I use the wash bucket for the wheels. Do you use a third bucket just to keep the bucket itself clean? I wash the bucket out after I am done.
I would love to be able to use a D/A polisher on my paintwork. I am sure it would make a huge difference, but I have no power, living in a top storey flat!

Just on access Jocko - have you ever tried these rinseless products like Optimum No Rinse?
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: Jocko on November 13, 2017, 05:38:58 PM
It is rinseless wash I use. Dodo Juice Low On Eau Rinseless Wash. It is superb. The second bucket is just to rinse the wash mitt in, between sections.
I take warm water down from the house, then fill the second bucket with cold water from our launderette, which is below the flats.
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: peteo48 on November 13, 2017, 07:22:56 PM

Didn't know whether to put this in the electric car thread or this one!

How to wash a Tesla. Does the rinse with filtered water!
Title: Ready for the winter
Post by: jazzway on November 13, 2017, 09:16:26 PM
I guess you could do both though

I think I now know why your car looks so good Jazzway. I've just topped up the wax (Bilt Hamber Double Speed Wax) - never clayed a car. I remain to be convinced about clay - after all we had shiny cars long before clay. Open to persuasion though.

I clay mine, but don't notice a great difference before and after. Even after the first time I did it.

When you don't see any difference, i think you have a very clean car, Jocko. But here's a photo i took of the piece of clay after i clayed a 40x40 centimeter part of our daughters car bonnet.

(https://i.imgur.com/859JGap.jpg)

This photo was last September, 6 months after i also clayed her car. It is an oily dirt and called traffic-or road film Oil, other car fluids and dirt accumulate on the roads and together with dirty exhaust gases comes on your car while driving, especially when it rains. When you do not regular wash the car, the dirt builds up and this road film cannot washed off other than with special, very aggressive TFR (traffic film remover) or claying. Also some dirt that never goes away with regular washes; tar spots, some sticky tree saps, can be removed with claying.
Road film is not something you can see easily, on our daughters black car i could see a brownish glow, but when you're not seeing it doesn't mean it isn't there.
And that's why it is important to clay a car once or twice a year BEFORE you wax! A wax, sealant or other coating doesn't bond well on dirt and is gone away in weeks instead of months.

Work back and forth and not in circles, do not push the clay onto the paint, but instead let it glide only with the weight of your (flat) hand. While claying always use plenty clay lube or another car detailing lubricant I use my rinseless wash shampoo in a stronger mix. When the clay is dirty fold it over to trap the dirt and carry on, using a clean side of clay. Also take your time, work in small parts and don't use a heavy grade clay-bar to get the job done faster.  You will then mar (damage) the paint which can only be polished out. I always use a fine grade clay-bar and depending the dirt i work longer, but always safe.

Hi Jazzway, how can you remove the roof trims please?
Push the rear of the trim forward to release the rear clip, lift the rear trim, pull the trim back to release the front clip. This video shows it: https://youtu.be/2LZN5UHPq04 (https://youtu.be/2LZN5UHPq04)

When I wash my car I use two buckets. Then after the car is washed I use the wash bucket for the wheels. Do you use a third bucket just to keep the bucket itself clean? I wash the bucket out after I am done.
I would love to be able to use a D/A polisher on my paintwork. I am sure it would make a huge difference, but I have no power, living in a top storey flat!
One bucket with soapy water, the 2nd with only water (and a grit guard) to rinse the wash mitt (or pad) between washing the car parts, and 3rd bucket is for the wheels. I only use a 3rd bucket for the wheels and wells when they are really dirty, and then do them first before i wash the rest of the car. The same for foaming, btw. When the car is only light to medium dirty i do a rinse with only water or a mild rinseless shampoo mix in a spray bottle before and then wash the car with 2 buckets, or do a rinse-less wash like you. 
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: Jocko on November 14, 2017, 12:50:42 PM
Every time I have clayed the car I have removed a lot of dirt, evident by the dirt on the clay (as in your picture). What I didn't see was any appreciable difference in the appearance of the car's paintwork. Perhaps it is the colour, or the fact that the paintwork had been roughly treated for 10 years before I got it. I bought the car from a dealer and it had been valeted before I got it, so it may have been clayed then.
Title: Ready for the winter
Post by: jazzway on November 14, 2017, 02:48:27 PM
Jocko, when you said you didn't see any difference, i was assuming also the clay stayed clean. When i clay our silver Jazz i also don't see a difference on the paint, but the clay-bar later showed it was there. The same with other light-medium colored cars, but our daughter's car is black and on that color you see everything! After a good wash and before claying, the car was clean with a brownish glow, after claying it was black.
The difference i always see, with every color, is when it's polished (cleanser polish, or other). When we picked up our Jazz 2 years ago it looked good, when i clayed and polished it( cleanser polish, done by hand) a few months later you could see a big difference - very smooth and there was a much improved clarity which made the metallic paint underneath sparkle. But as i said previous, when you don't see road/traffic film that doesn't mean it isn't there. You just proved that. When you want the best durability of a wax, sealant or coating, the paint has to be clean!
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: Jocko on November 14, 2017, 02:56:18 PM
As I said earlier. My car would really benefit with a polish with a D/A. I just hand polish, with Meguiar`s G17216EU Ultimate Compound, then wax with the Bilt Hamber Double Speed-Wax.
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: VicW on November 14, 2017, 03:18:04 PM
I gave up polishing cars donkeys years ago, I consider that for the difference it makes to the appearance and value isn't worth the outlay or effort.
Having a drive means that I can wash the car with a hose attached to a lance with a brush having first washed the grit off with the hose and a jet.No chance of grit scratching
 the paintwork. The wheels get done with a wheel brush on the hose. The garage hose also runs off softened water so if the weather is a bit iffy only the windows get leather dried the body gets the water removed with a squeegee. Soft water means no marks left as it dries out.
In the winter the wheel arches and underside get sprayed as well to get the mud and salt out.
The last cleaning expense I had was a new leather after ten years of use.
I am told that the new wash and polish liquids are very good even if the car is grubby but I would be a bit worried about the grit on the bodywork.

Vic.
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: jazzway on November 14, 2017, 03:28:10 PM
As I said earlier. My car would really benefit with a polish with a D/A. I just hand polish, with Meguiar`s G17216EU Ultimate Compound, then wax with the Bilt Hamber Double Speed-Wax.
I know and you also mentioned it another post. Yes, a correction polish done with a D/A machine, when done good, it removes a little clear-coat and with that swirls and scratches go away that improves shine. You can also do it by hand, but not as perfect and it's a really hard job. But by using it by hand as you do, you are still cleaning the paint! And from the photos i have seen, your car looks really good!

You can try another polish maybe. Poorboy's World White Diamond or -Blank Hole f.e., it's a cleanser polish and it fills swirls and minor scratches beautiful, then wax and enjoy the shine! :)
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: peteo48 on November 14, 2017, 04:57:25 PM
I gave up polishing cars donkeys years ago, I consider that for the difference it makes to the appearance and value isn't worth the outlay or effort.
Having a drive means that I can wash the car with a hose attached to a lance with a brush having first washed the grit off with the hose and a jet.No chance of grit scratching
 the paintwork. The wheels get done with a wheel brush on the hose. The garage hose also runs off softened water so if the weather is a bit iffy only the windows get leather dried the body gets the water removed with a squeegee. Soft water means no marks left as it dries out.
In the winter the wheel arches and underside get sprayed as well to get the mud and salt out.
The last cleaning expense I had was a new leather after ten years of use.
I am told that the new wash and polish liquids are very good even if the car is grubby but I would be a bit worried about the grit on the bodywork.

Vic.

I may have mentioned this before but my neighbour uses the Tesco hand wash - OK he gets a new car every 3 years but his car looks absolutely fine - it even beads up after rain.

Now before I waxed my car pre this winter, I had been using Autoglym Aqua Wax. Instead of using a drying towel or chamois, you spray this on the wet car (after hosing all the shampoo off) and go round the car drying off with one micro fibre and then quickly buffing with another (both come in the kit). I must admit the car beaded up a treat so I'm thinking this maybe all you need unless you want to go to the next level.
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: Jocko on December 03, 2017, 05:02:46 PM
The weather was a bit milder today so I decided to give my car a wash. It was filthy, after a load of motorway miles this past couple of weeks. The roads here are very dirty, now that gritting is in full swing.
I used the two bucket method and my Dodo Juice Rinseless shampoo. I used my "Dirty" mitt to clean the bottom of the car, but didn't towel it. I then started from the roof down, as I would do in the summer, using the "Clean" mitt and towelling dry between panels. I washed the entire car this way, having removed the worst of the dirt prior to starting the wash proper. If I had access to running water, and a hose, I would be able to remove the heavy dirt deposits so much easier. When I finished I binned the "Dirty" mitt and ordered a fresh one for "Clean" use!
Once the car was washed and dried I cleaned the windows using Black Diamond Quick Glass, buffing up with kitchen towel. I then sprayed the tyres with Autoglym Tyre Dressing. I then took a couple of photographs with my phone.
Car doesn't look too bad for 180 miles short of 100,000.

(https://i.imgur.com/O7BodhA.jpg)
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: MartinJG on December 03, 2017, 05:25:04 PM
 Jocko

I was talking to a car dealer a while back and he warned about buying a car from Scotland. Despite modern proofing, the rust underneath is usually far worse than in the south, even with fairly young cars. This must be down to road conditions, gritting and the greater humidity. Seems to me that wherever you go up there you are never far from water.

PS - I have just noticed your registration!
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: jazzway on December 03, 2017, 10:13:07 PM
...
Car doesn't look too bad for 180 miles short of 100,000.

(https://i.imgur.com/O7BodhA.jpg)
The car looks great!! And i wish ours had that color. ;)

I have washed ours twice since the end of September, last week was a rinseless one. But getting really cold and winter weather on its way now, she has to do it without, haha.
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: Jocko on December 09, 2017, 11:19:02 AM
New wash mitt arrived today. It is a Meguiar's mitt this time, and seems like a quality item. This has a much shorter  texture than the "worm" style of the previous one. And a lot easier to get my large hands in!

Old ones.
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71xARKKuguL._SL1000_.jpg)

New one.
(http://i1.adis.ws/i/washford/232934a?w=637&h=403)
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: peteo48 on December 09, 2017, 01:02:54 PM
Car looks great for 100,000 miles Jocko. Given you don't have access to a hose or outside tap, do you go straight into a wash with the rinseless product or wet the car first?
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: jazzway on December 09, 2017, 02:24:39 PM
When i do a rinseless wash i spray in the panel i am going to wash first, with the same solution. Or on a bit more dirtier and the lower parts spray in the next panel(s) so it gets some time to loosen the dirt before you wash it. 
Title: Re: Ready for the winter
Post by: Jocko on December 09, 2017, 02:26:15 PM
I just use the rinseless wash, but copious amounts to flush off the worst of the dirt. I next wash the bottom half using  my "Dirty" mitt then, from the top down, with the "Clean" mitt and towel.