Clubjazz - Honda Jazz & HR-V Forums

Honda Jazz, HR-V & Hybrid Forums => Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - 2020 => Topic started by: Jazz999 on February 24, 2020, 08:01:56 PM

Title: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: Jazz999 on February 24, 2020, 08:01:56 PM
Well folks, have spoken to 4 different dealerships today, and they all confirm to my suprise that Honda will not be selling the all petrol jazz alongside the hybrid.. when they gone, they gone.  I thought they may continue to provide the all petrol cars over the next 12 months at least, until they get a good feel of sales of hybrid .  So all you jazz lovers, get used to the idea of having an automatic . I for one won't be going to hybrid anytime soon, paying out lots of extra cash for petrol and battery.  I just bought a new EX last week, and will run it into the ground now, so at least Honda won't be getting my new car money every two years. Shame really, I am a big Jazz fan
I guess Honda must be hoping that all its current owners are going to buy honda hybrid jazz for the next vehicle. Good luck with that Honda
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: Jocko on February 24, 2020, 08:15:43 PM
I have never bought a new car (the newest I ever owned was three-year-old). My current Jazz will be 14 later this year. If you keep your EX for 14 years you will just be in time to buy a Hybrid before it becomes illegal to sell them in the UK (unless they change the cut off to 2032 as has been mooted).
After driving automatics for 25 years, before this Jazz, I would be happy to go to another auto, as long as it is not a CVT.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: Jazz999 on February 24, 2020, 08:28:40 PM
Yes will I hope it lasts me 14 years, then I won't need to buy a car at all, with all the money I will save over the next 14 years, I will use a taxi everytime I go out and still be quids in. Automatics never been my thing, and never will be.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: monkeydave on February 24, 2020, 08:46:11 PM
they are going to be sorry, i change my car quite regular but now i bought this jazz as its the last petrol 6 speed manual and i will be keeping it for a very long time

so i think they will loose quite a bit of money if they are all cvt hybrids starting at £18.5k

the 2022 euro 7 doesnt help either as well as the jumping around with banning dates from 2040 to 2035 to 2032

somehow i cant ever see electric cars taking over the 35 million normal cars in this country with the amount of people living in flats and terrace houses unable to charge at night

they are going the right way of destroying the car industry but that is the plan isnt it? stop private mobility for the plebs, these greenies have a lot to answer for
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: trebor1652 on February 24, 2020, 09:26:21 PM
Well worth a read.

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/honda-reveals-new-details-2020-hybrid-only-jazz

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: Jazz999 on February 24, 2020, 09:51:39 PM
Yes I think they find out the hard way. Even though the write up says they expect a dip in sales during launch period, they expecting it to pick back up, but I think they may find out that life isn't how you think it may turn out. 18 grand for entry level..hahaha, just wait a couple of years until all the ports are full of un sold hybrids, and they will be heavily discounted just to make space
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: Rory on February 24, 2020, 10:04:07 PM
Honda seem to be really struggling right across Europe.   The Honda e is getting quite a good reception and might turn out to be a bit of a cult car.  Honda better hope so!
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: MartinJG on February 24, 2020, 10:15:47 PM
I think it is quite possible and feasible that we will see a scenario in the future where battery 'top ups' are purchased at your local fuel station. They already have the facilities and logistical advantages in place to provide a retail service and a ready prepared fast charge 'battery pack swap' makes sense to me for a number of reasons. Much of the recharging could be carried out overnight at lower rates at a special facility rather than just going up in smoke at the power stations and would simply be delivered to the fuel station. Clearly, the manufacturers will have to come to an industry standard generic specification. I am sure Shell 'Et Al' will be delighted to oblige. What is more, subject to the usual stringent safety standards, they will be forced to compete both in terms of price and quality/technology. Seems really quite straightforward to me. I see no sensible reason why this country could not be at the forefront of such a logical development.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: ColinB on February 24, 2020, 10:27:06 PM
I think it is quite possible and feasible that we will see a scenario in the future where battery 'top ups' are purchased at your local fuel station. They already have the facilities and logistical advantages in place to provide a retail service and a ready prepared fast charge 'battery pack swap' makes sense to me for a number of reasons. Much of the recharging could be carried out overnight at lower rates at a special facility rather than just going up in smoke at the power stations and would simply be delivered to the fuel station. Clearly, the manufacturers will have to come to an industry standard generic specification. I am sure Shell 'Et Al' will be delighted to oblige. What is more, subject to the usual stringent safety standards, they will be forced to compete both in terms of price and quality/technology. Seems really quite straightforward to me. I see no sensible reason why this country could not be at the forefront of such a logical development.
There is already competition in the EV charging market, but the indications are that this is not necessarily resulting in benefits to the motorist:
https://www.whatcar.com/news/electric-vehicle-charging-%E2%80%93-what-does-it-really-cost/n16833
No reason to believe that'll improve in future, so if you don't have the ability to charge at home, you'll get ripped off.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: MartinJG on February 24, 2020, 10:36:43 PM
I think it is quite possible and feasible that we will see a scenario in the future where battery 'top ups' are purchased at your local fuel station. They already have the facilities and logistical advantages in place to provide a retail service and a ready prepared fast charge 'battery pack swap' makes sense to me for a number of reasons. Much of the recharging could be carried out overnight at lower rates at a special facility rather than just going up in smoke at the power stations and would simply be delivered to the fuel station. Clearly, the manufacturers will have to come to an industry standard generic specification. I am sure Shell 'Et Al' will be delighted to oblige. What is more, subject to the usual stringent safety standards, they will be forced to compete both in terms of price and quality/technology. Seems really quite straightforward to me. I see no sensible reason why this country could not be at the forefront of such a logical development.
There is already competition in the EV charging market, but the indications are that this is not necessarily resulting in benefits to the motorist:
https://www.whatcar.com/news/electric-vehicle-charging-%E2%80%93-what-does-it-really-cost/n16833
No reason to believe that'll improve in future, so if you don't have the ability to charge at home, you'll get ripped off.

Competition has never done anyone any harm. Besides, it should keep the greenies happy, assuming that is at all possible or even desirable... :)

PS - Re the article linked, if I am right, these charging stations will be phased out entirely.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: John A on February 25, 2020, 06:41:37 AM
My 2016 Jazz is the first automatic car I've owned, apart from the revs not rising directly in response to road speed when accelerating, and not having to use a clutch, I've not had to adapt my driving style to it. Driving a 6 speed manual version I seemed to be changing gear all the time to keep the engine in a sweet spot, not a worry with the automatic.

But, the current prices don't give me an economic reason to change, and the environmental impact of bringing a new car onto the roads must be close to any savings due to the reduced fuel consumption. So I'll wait a couple of years and pay about half the new cost just like I did with my current car  :)
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: ColinB on February 25, 2020, 07:57:10 AM
PS - Re the article linked, if I am right, these charging stations will be phased out entirely.

I assume you mean that you think battery swapping will be the way forward and hence there’ll be no need for charging points?
Maybe:
https://www.topgear.com/car-news/big-reads/power-shift-battery-swapping-our-way-across-china
That’s one manufacturer building their own battery swap infrastructure for their own cars. I have no idea whether £23 for a new battery is expensive in China, but you can bet it wouldn’t be that cheap in Europe, so my original point - that EV motoring won’t necessarily be cheap without home charging - still seems valid.
But what are the chances of every single EV manufacturer agreeing to standardise on a universal battery design? None of the proponents have done that so far:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charging_station (Scroll down to the section on battery swapping)
Interesting that the EV market leader (Tesla) started down this road but has given up, and at least one of the other start-ups has gone bust.
So it would be nice if the charging & range anxiety problems could be solved by swapping the batteries out, but the omens are not good.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: culzean on February 25, 2020, 08:25:52 AM
Problem with swopping batteries,  you may take care of yours and when you swop you end up with an older battery that has been ragged and neglected ( like maybe even being left on someones driveway fully charged all the time - which is a killer for Li-Ion chemistry ).  Most BEV are built around the battery anyway,  and they are large and very heavy and not easily removed - and the chances of car makers agreeing on a standard is remote.   The reason why the idea of using BEV batteries to store grid power is really bad is that it subjects the battery to many more charge and discharge cycles than it would normally see,  and that degrades the battery.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: culzean on February 25, 2020, 08:29:13 AM
Honda seem to be really struggling right across Europe.   The Honda e is getting quite a good reception and might turn out to be a bit of a cult car.  Honda better hope so!

Europe has always been a tiny market for Honda - with UK probably their best in this neck of the woods. The USA, Japan and Asia are their key markets,  where they are respected for their engineering and styling....
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: Jocko on February 25, 2020, 09:13:20 AM
Fully Charged did a live event in Texas, and though heavily US-centric it was quite interesting in their views on Tesla and the viability of the "old school" car manufacturers. Their view was that Ford, GM, VW and the like would have to merge or go out of business as the world changes to BEV vehicles. There was one European voice in the audience, but the panel was not really for listening.
Regarding battery swapping. I think it may happen if the technology doesn't overtake it, but not in this century.


Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: peteo48 on February 25, 2020, 10:27:45 AM
Of course the other issue with the Mk4 Jazz is that it will mark the end of the manual gear change and that might deter some buyers as well.

To be fair, though, people who prefer manual gearboxes might have to get real. They are on their way out. All BEVs are in effect gearbox free operating with a single reduction gear. The new Jazz has no gearbox in the traditional sense of the word (that new system already available on the hybrid CRV).

Part of my thinking in getting my current car, apart from the financial inducements, was on the basis that I would be keeping it for at least 5 years. As we move to the end of ICE car production (and I think most manufacturers won't want to be caught with their pants down so I doubt many ICE cars will be available new after 2030) it will be interesting to see what the market value of the last few ICE cars, of any brand, will be. They will either be worth little more than scrap or the opposite may occur - people may want to remain members of the ICE club for as long as possible.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: MartinJG on February 25, 2020, 11:00:53 AM
Think VHS video format back in the last century. I recall Sony Betamax was considered to be the better format but was too expensive so not adopted and Sony lost out there on R&D costs. Back to EV battery swaps. At the risk of being overly simplistic, the way I see it is rather than filling your fuel tank, you simply replace the battery. So, let's just say it costs £30 to fill a Jazz tank and you get 400 miles using fibometer figures. Imagine the future scenario. You get a battery low warning so you head for the nearest fuel station, although you would prefer Shell because they currently have the best prices and best nationwide battery backup service in case of failure. You drive in and some tech attendant opens the battery compartment (boot?) removes the old one and slots in the replacement. Since batteries are heavy, he uses a special bit of equipment designed for the job.  However, battery technology is improving all the time so they will get smaller and lighter over time. At some point in the future, the battery tech guy is made redundant because he is no longer required simply because even 'Victoria Beckham' can replace a battery without damaging those precious finger nails. Can we replace the calorific value of a typical tank of fuel today. No. The range is limited but the starters will be in town where emissions in high population belts is a priority, the average mileage covered is next to nothing and there is no shortage of fuel stations. Technology will gradually extend to us 'Hicks in the countryside'. On cost, let's say we live in a free economy, a big if for all those doubters and closet commies :). As with all free economies, the balance of supply and demand is the solution in itself and initiative, enterprise and commercial gain will provide the answers. Think Friedman economics rather than Keynes.

I think that just about covers it.

PS -  I guess it is 'tuff' for those £5 fillers although I would not be surprised if they were catered for at some point.

PPS - Doubtless, the guvverment lackies will intervene for all the usual reasons, not least that juicy duty they extract along with fags and booze.

PPPS - I strongly suspect that the DIY chargers could well be outlawed on grounds of safety etc. even though the real reason is that the VAT we pay is peanuts compared with the duty extracted over the life of a typical driver.

Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: Downsizer on February 25, 2020, 11:55:14 AM
Taxation can be used now to encourage the take-up of EV technology, helping to clean the air in cities.  However, once I/C engines are banned and our behaviour has been changed, politicians will see battery top-up or swapping as a very tempting taxation opportunity.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: Jocko on February 25, 2020, 01:30:00 PM
In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: madasafish on February 25, 2020, 01:35:35 PM
I think it is quite possible and feasible that we will see a scenario in the future where battery 'top ups' are purchased at your local fuel station. They already have the facilities and logistical advantages in place to provide a retail service and a ready prepared fast charge 'battery pack swap' makes sense to me for a number of reasons. Much of the recharging could be carried out overnight at lower rates at a special facility rather than just going up in smoke at the power stations and would simply be delivered to the fuel station. Clearly, the manufacturers will have to come to an industry standard generic specification. I am sure Shell 'Et Al' will be delighted to oblige. What is more, subject to the usual stringent safety standards, they will be forced to compete both in terms of price and quality/technology. Seems really quite straightforward to me. I see no sensible reason why this country could not be at the forefront of such a logical development.

Batteries are currently NOT interchangeable. There are no plans to do so for obvious reaons:
They are very heavy 100kg + to over 250kg
They are an integral part of the car integrated into the structure..

If batteries were modular, designed to be chaged and mounted on a rail system so they could be slid in and out on  a motorised system (manual systems will not work due to the weight)  and tested before they are replaced  ( a faulty battery will be expensive to repair and unchargeable), then your proposal is possible...  Otherwise it's pie in the sky.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: MartinJG on February 25, 2020, 02:23:56 PM
I think it is quite possible and feasible that we will see a scenario in the future where battery 'top ups' are purchased at your local fuel station. They already have the facilities and logistical advantages in place to provide a retail service and a ready prepared fast charge 'battery pack swap' makes sense to me for a number of reasons. Much of the recharging could be carried out overnight at lower rates at a special facility rather than just going up in smoke at the power stations and would simply be delivered to the fuel station. Clearly, the manufacturers will have to come to an industry standard generic specification. I am sure Shell 'Et Al' will be delighted to oblige. What is more, subject to the usual stringent safety standards, they will be forced to compete both in terms of price and quality/technology. Seems really quite straightforward to me. I see no sensible reason why this country could not be at the forefront of such a logical development.

Batteries are currently NOT interchangeable. There are no plans to do so for obvious reaons:
They are very heavy 100kg + to over 250kg
They are an integral part of the car integrated into the structure..

If batteries were modular, designed to be chaged and mounted on a rail system so they could be slid in and out on  a motorised system (manual systems will not work due to the weight)  and tested before they are replaced  ( a faulty battery will be expensive to repair and unchargeable), then your proposal is possible...  Otherwise it's pie in the sky.


I think most of us know this but the world does not stand still despite the best efforts of those with a vested interest in inertia. They said much the same thing about Henry Ford. The motor car would never catch on, it was just too noisy etc. Funny old world...
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: culzean on February 25, 2020, 02:49:17 PM
This is interesting, and what I have said for a long time - potential buyers are not being told the whole story on battery life and range - I guess Tesla can offer 8 year unlimited mileage warranty because it is factored into the sale price of the car, when the BEV market starts to get competitive and more realistic on price ( ie prices normal punters can afford ) will long warranties be offered ?

Bit like having a 10 gallon fuel tank that you need to keep above 3 gallons but below 8 otherwise it gets damaged,  and if you fill it too quickly it gets damaged..... so most of the time you have to fill over many hours, even though fast petrol pumps are available you can only use them occasionally, and most of the time you have to dribble fuel in.

Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: monkeydave on February 25, 2020, 05:06:57 PM
Of course the other issue with the Mk4 Jazz is that it will mark the end of the manual gear change and that might deter some buyers as well.

To be fair, though, people who prefer manual gearboxes might have to get real. They are on their way out. All BEVs are in effect gearbox free operating with a single reduction gear. The new Jazz has no gearbox in the traditional sense of the word (that new system already available on the hybrid CRV).

Part of my thinking in getting my current car, apart from the financial inducements, was on the basis that I would be keeping it for at least 5 years. As we move to the end of ICE car production (and I think most manufacturers won't want to be caught with their pants down so I doubt many ICE cars will be available new after 2030) it will be interesting to see what the market value of the last few ICE cars, of any brand, will be. They will either be worth little more than scrap or the opposite may occur - people may want to remain members of the ICE club for as long as possible.

seeing as if you have a petrol car before the cut off you can drive it till 2050 so will be worth more than scrap to people who dont want to pay over double for a lesser car
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: John Ratsey on February 25, 2020, 09:15:54 PM
Batteries are currently NOT interchangeable. There are no plans to do so for obvious reaons:
They are very heavy 100kg + to over 250kg
They are an integral part of the car integrated into the structure..
There's a picture of a Tesla battery pack at https://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/posts/3705440/ . It is effectively the floor pan. Reasons for this are probably (i) get the centre of gravity as low as possible and (ii) better protection of the lithium in the event of a collision.

Back on topic, I think there would be no commercial sense in continuing to sell a petrol Mk. 3 Jazz in Europe once the Mk. 4 has arrived. Honda needs to pull a few tricks to minimise the EU penalty if average emissions exceed 95 g/km CO2 and the Japanese tend to pay by the rules whereas the European manufacturers try to game the system (eg dieselgate). The Mk 4 Jazz is (IIRC) over the limit at 107 g/km (for comparison the Corolla hybrid is listed as 106 g/km). The latest Which? included some data showing that the tighter emissions requirements of Euro 6D-temp and 6d plus the WLTP testing have combined to push up the CO2 numbers. Part of the reason seems to be the weight of extra equipment for emissions reduction. €95 per gram over the limit for each vehicle should provide a big incentive to bring the CO2 down. It's either that we all have to downsize or there must be more PHEVs and BEVs in the pipeline (or all of them).

And as for wanting a manual gearbox, the hybrids will have various other settings for drivers to play with which will involve trade-offs between economy and performance.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: MartinJG on February 25, 2020, 09:19:44 PM
This is interesting, and what I have said for a long time - potential buyers are not being told the whole story on battery life and range - I guess Tesla can offer 8 year unlimited mileage warranty because it is factored into the sale price of the car, when the BEV market starts to get competitive and more realistic on price ( ie prices normal punters can afford ) will long warranties be offered ?

Bit like having a 10 gallon fuel tank that you need to keep above 3 gallons but below 8 otherwise it gets damaged,  and if you fill it too quickly it gets damaged..... so most of the time you have to fill over many hours, even though fast petrol pumps are available you can only use them occasionally, and most of the time you have to dribble fuel in.


Interesting. We all use rechargeable batteries these days and I always understood that due to 'memory cell' cycling, quick and short recharges actually shorten the life of a bog standard lithium battery and that the recommended treatment is to periodically run them right down followed by a complete full charge to 'exercise' the battery. My battery charger has a recycle facility on it which does this very thing.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: John Ratsey on February 25, 2020, 10:09:21 PM
Interesting. We all use rechargeable batteries these days and I always understood that due to 'memory cell' cycling, quick and short recharges actually shorten the life of a bog standard lithium battery and that the recommended treatment is to periodically run them right down followed by a complete full charge to 'exercise' the battery. My battery charger has a recycle facility on it which does this very thing.
The charge memory problem relates to nickel-based batteries and that chemistry is still dominant for household rechargeables. Lithium batteries survive longest if the extremes of charging are avoided - most of the damage to the chemistry occurs when either cramming in the last 10 to 15% of charge (which is why most devices change to a slower charge mode when the battery is nearly full) and sucking out the bottom 10 to 15% of charge. I think there are device manufacturers who configure the electronics so that the available charge range is reduced in order to improve the battery longevity.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: richardfrost on February 26, 2020, 09:16:54 AM
My view, quite simply, is that electric is the future, batteries are not.

We are going to have to go with fuel cell or some other rapidly refillable technology, supplemented by solar and even the ability to pick up power from the road somehow.

Trams and trolley buses eh! What a daft idea. Glad we got rid of those things!

I have asked my good friend who is a Professor working in the field of car power electronics what he thinks the future might be. I'll get back to you.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: culzean on February 26, 2020, 10:01:00 AM
Interesting. We all use rechargeable batteries these days and I always understood that due to 'memory cell' cycling, quick and short recharges actually shorten the life of a bog standard lithium battery and that the recommended treatment is to periodically run them right down followed by a complete full charge to 'exercise' the battery. My battery charger has a recycle facility on it which does this very thing.
The charge memory problem relates to nickel-based batteries and that chemistry is still dominant for household rechargeables. Lithium batteries survive longest if the extremes of charging are avoided - most of the damage to the chemistry occurs when either cramming in the last 10 to 15% of charge (which is why most devices change to a slower charge mode when the battery is nearly full) and sucking out the bottom 10 to 15% of charge. I think there are device manufacturers who configure the electronics so that the available charge range is reduced in order to improve the battery longevity.

Yeah, nickel cadmium was the worst, nickel metal hydride were much better - but the whole thing about lithium based batteries is that they do not have a memory - but I agree with you John that the future may be electric but not so much battery based.

I think they discovered the limits of Ni-cad  batteries in early satellites where they had solar panels that continually charged the batteries to the same place and the batteries would then not discharge properly even though they had power in there they would not release it.  Early Nicad and NMH batteries in laptops and phones also used to suffer 'bridging' by the growth of dendrites ( like stalactites ) between positive and negative plates which shorted out the cells,  we used to cure them by discharging a capacitor into the battery to blow up these dendrites - then deep discharge and recharge - lasted for a while longer.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nickel%E2%80%93cadmium_battery
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: Jocko on February 26, 2020, 10:41:01 AM
There is currently huge research in battery technology so we can only hope something comes off it. From what I have read, 100% charge of the battery as indicated by the vehicle is not 100% of the battery capacity. The electronic control stops it short. Same with the discharge cycle at the other end. That was how Tesla was able to increase the range of US vehicles trying to escape the hurricane. The opened up the range to allow the battery to use the top and bottom charge.
The Porsche Taycan can add 100 miles range with a 20-minute charge. It uses a higher voltage system and with a suitable charger can charge very quickly. However, there are only 4 of those chargers in the UK.
Battery electric will never work for all users but for very many private owners what we have now is not far away for what will be required.
Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: MartinJG on February 26, 2020, 11:42:37 AM

'I see no sensible reason why this country could not be at the forefront of such a logical development.'

In reference to the above in my earlier 'speech'. I say this because the Brits are/were notorious for their 'Heath Robinson' approach to improvising and squeezing every last drop out of existing technology/infrastructure if it means we can avoid spending more than necessary, and we lay claim to some fine engineers over the years. We managed to squeeze a ridiculous amount of life out of the Austin/Morris based Mini engine A+ to the point of embarrassment while our German and Japanese friends had already re invented the wheel several times over before we reluctantly conceded that it was a little long in the tooth and due for retirement.... :(

Title: Re: End of the all petrol jazz
Post by: jazzaro on February 26, 2020, 07:01:11 PM
Well folks, have spoken to 4 different dealerships today, and they all confirm to my suprise that Honda will not be selling the all petrol jazz alongside the hybrid.. when they gone, they gone.  I thought they may continue to provide the all petrol cars over the next 12 months at least, until they get a good feel of sales of hybrid .  So all you jazz lovers, get used to the idea of having an automatic . I for one won't be going to hybrid anytime soon, paying out lots of extra cash for petrol and battery.  I just bought a new EX last week, and will run it into the ground now, so at least Honda won't be getting my new car money every two years. Shame really, I am a big Jazz fan
I guess Honda must be hoping that all its current owners are going to buy honda hybrid jazz for the next vehicle. Good luck with that Honda
Yes, the present 1.3 16v will be sold only in the japanese  and in some other asian markets, where CO2 fines are not a problem, where an hybrid jazz would be too expensive, where sales are high and Honda can offer a big price list.
In Europe Honda needs to sell low carbon imprint models, and the 1.3 16v has a bigger consumption than the Hybrid. Second reason, models coming from a far assembly plant and with low sales (JAzz sold 30000 pieces in the 2019 in EU) usually have to  reduce variants to stem  logistic costs, that's why europe lost Jazz with petrol engines.