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Further to the above post, today I had a trip into Edinburgh city centre, during the morning rush hour, and in hard frost and even freezing fog at one stage. I then travelled across the city centre and out to Danderhall on the southern edge, From there I had a trip out to Dalkeith then back to Danderhall. I then had a run back, along the city bypass, then M8, M9 and M90, before returning to Kirkcaldy. Still in sub zero conditions.
Every start was with a cold engine (blue light on).
My ScanGauge E recorded an average of 49.1 mpg (not far from the actual mpg, going by experience). The average speed was 26 mph with a max of 59 mph. Maximum revs were 2917 rpm.
I use the ScanGauge because my Jazz only has a single mpg meter. The ScanGauge gives me instantaneous readings. If your Jazz can display instantaneous readings then view that while driving.

The top display is the instantaneous reading, and the lower the average for the current journey. The secret is to try and keep the top number higher than the bottom one. Things like lifting off just before you crest a hill. Or changing up just before the crest.
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Stalling and misfire on mk1 can also be commonly caused by rear plugs never being replaced ( not many any people,including garages know that engine has 8 plugs ) and the gap being way too big, and if left this can cause one or more rear coli packs to fail.
Based on my experience changing the plugs, I for the life of me have no clue where these would be so I suspect as Jocko pointed out, that mine only has 4 given it is the American version. I should note that when I changed mine, that I feel they were essentially on the rear side with nothing under the cowl/intake in front. Kind of wish it had 2 sets just so I'd have a potential fix to the compression issue as further reading doesn't make me feel the EGR could cause that. That said I do think mine probably has the EGR issue as well due to the random misfire codes so I'll take time regardless now this weekend to try and clean it out.
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Dealers & Insurance / Re: Vertu honda?
« Last post by evijaymohan on Today at 11:20:02 AM »
I started observing some faint chirping/rattling noise from front ( below is the link on he forum for discussion)

https://clubjazz.org/forum/index.php?topic=10815

On check up at Honda service center, it was found that CVT fluid is low ... Now I am even more frustrated..
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I had a visit to Honda Services today, They found the CVT oil is low.

They did not guarantee that noise would be ok after CVT oil refill.

Scared !!
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Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: Steel wheels and winter tyres
« Last post by culzean on Today at 11:10:23 AM »
https://www.wheel-size.com/size/honda/jazz/2004/

You need to be careful as the 2004 Jazz was fitted with 14" or 15" wheels where later ones probably had 15" or 16" rims.

The difference in tyre rolling radius between 185/55R16 ( on 16" rims) and 175/65R15 ( on 15" rims) is negligible - but I don't know what tyre you could fit to a 14" rim to get the same radius,  so you need to know what your original rims and tyres are ( will be on the sidewall of tyre).  Even then I doubt the 14" rims will clear the brake calipers even if you can fit them instead of 16" rims,  or what your speedometer will read..

https://tiresize.com/tyre-size-calculator/
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Off Topic (Non-Honda) / Re: WTO rules?
« Last post by culzean on Today at 10:42:10 AM »
Interesting article about Remainers getting Brexiteers motives wrong ( but maybe on purpose ).

https://brexitcentral.com/remainers-wont-get-brexit-understand-caricature-brexiteers-entirely-wrong/
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Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: Steel wheels and winter tyres
« Last post by John A on Today at 10:17:05 AM »
Winter tyres are like chalk and cheese with summers in ice and snow - I used to be out to get to work very early and before I got winters I used to have to go out even earlier and clear the hill out of our estate and salt it from the bins,  not what you really want to be doing at 4AM.   After winters fitted I used to sail up the road and left the untouched road for later users to get stuck on ( I doubt they ever realised I had cleaned the road for them before) a lot of cars on our estate used to park along the main road about half a mile from our estate and walk rather than try to get up or down the twisty hill.  Remember that winters are much, much better for steering and braking as well,  it is not all about traction,  more about grip.   IIRC roads in Scotland have a much grippier surface than English roads,  there are warnings on my motorbike forum about extra tyre wear when in Scotland......

I have all season tyres on my card, usually Scotland's weather doesn't get to the temperatures in the south-east of England, so I reckon they're a good compromise for me. Had winter tyres on my Qashqai and it would go up hills in two wheel drive that were impassible if summer ones were fitted.
I'm sure that the tyres do wear much quicker up here, but don't ask me to prove it!
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Think the earliest US models were 1.5 Litre VTEC equipped, so only 4 spark plugs.

Yes,  there was a L15A2 i-DSI engine but Japan only I think.
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Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: Steel wheels and winter tyres
« Last post by culzean on Today at 10:02:31 AM »
I have to ask.
Unless you live out in the wilds of the countryside, or perhaps the Highlands of Scotland, do we really need winter tyres on any family  car in the U.K.
I probably agree the use of steel wheels in the winter, but in over 60 years of driving, I have never had to change the tyres on any vehicle that I have owned, for winter driving.
It's obviously important to ensure that your tyres are in good condition at all times and when the road conditions are poor, surely you accordingly?

Winter tyres are like chalk and cheese with summers in ice and snow ( or even just cold and wet roads)- I used to be out to get to work very early and before I got winters I used to have to go out even earlier and clear the hill out of our estate and salt it from the bins,  not what you really want to be doing at 4AM.   After winters fitted I used to sail up the road and left the untouched road for later users to get stuck on ( I doubt they ever realised I had cleaned the road for them before) a lot of cars on our estate used to park along the main road about half a mile from our estate and walk rather than try to get up or down the twisty hill.  Remember that winters are much, much better for steering and braking as well,  it is not all about traction,  more about grip.   IIRC roads in Scotland have a much grippier surface than English roads,  there are warnings on my motorbike forum about extra tyre wear when in Scotland......

I have been through some of the worst winters in living memory on cars ( some rear wheel drive with a bag of sand or a paving slab in the boot ) with summer tyres but it was a struggle and you were always liable to get pretty well stuck and need outside help with pushing,  but with winter tyres it is a breeze. My wifes Nokian WRD3 are on their 4th winter and the present Nokians on my Civic on their 3rd while the alloys are snug in the garage ready waxed for spring.  If you want to use steel wheels in winter what is the point in having summer tyres on them ?  Winter tyres are not as expensive as summers anyway,  and while your winters are wearing your summers are not.  It is also easy to wash down steel wheels and slap a coat of Hammerite on them if required,  something you would not do with alloys which can get very expensive to refurbish properly.   Alloys really take a hammering when roads are salted,  and steel wheels protect the brakes ( especially the stupid Jazz rear discs) from a lot of crap because they have far less open area than alloys.


I am happy when my wife goes out in dodgy weather that she can get where she want to go and her tyres will not be the cause of her getting stuck somehwere,  we have some pretty good hills in Shropshire that are deadly when snow on them.

The only real extra expense is the steel rims,  as your summer tyres get no wear for six months of the year - but unlike alloys steel rims last for ever with little care.  I suppose it depends how long you keep a vehicle and if the rims will fit your next one as I doubt many garages or private buyers would want to pay for your steel rims / winter tyres when buying the car.

here is a great test and video for anyone who doubts how good winter tyres are.  Two videos, one at the snowdome and another showing tyres when road temp is below 7 deg C.

https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/car-news/66692/winter-tyres-4x4-grip-test-video
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Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: Steel wheels and winter tyres
« Last post by Jocko on Today at 08:37:22 AM »
I have never had, or needed, winter tyres. We get snow and ice so seldom it is not worth while. On the one day it is bad I just leave the car in the garage!
When I worked in Greenock I bought a set of snow chains. 10 years later I sold the car with them still in the boot, unused!
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