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Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: 2018 facelift pricing announced
« Last post by Jocko on January 16, 2018, 05:58:26 PM »
Jazz weighs 1098 kg, the Accord 1532 kg, That's almost half as much again. Replacing a 2 litre engine with a 1.5 normally aspirated would lack performance, hence the turbo.
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Honda Jazz Mk1 2002-2008 / Re: 08 CVT-7 Jazz Mk1 - Good buy?
« Last post by zzaj on January 16, 2018, 05:27:54 PM »
If you are anxious about buying a car, from any dealer or privately, I suggest you consider:

https://www.dekra-expert.co.uk/vehicle.inspections

For not a lot you'll get an awful lot and a great degree of peace of mind.

They are highly regarded, independent, very knowledgeable  and you get to talk to the inspector who will run through the report with you. It might save you money if not worry.

They do the AA vehicle inspections for the AA and then the AA charge you more!
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Honda Jazz Mk1 2002-2008 / Re: gearbox problem
« Last post by TG on January 16, 2018, 05:09:34 PM »
My old colleague has just spent two years designing/specifying/testing the drivetrain bearings for the new Skoda Kodiak, I had assumed it was about a week's work.  A good bit of East Midlands engineering.
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TG
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Honda Jazz Mk1 2002-2008 / Re: CVT Judder
« Last post by TG on January 16, 2018, 05:01:08 PM »
Pretty simple really.

But two containers of Honda CVT-F, no other fluid, plus a drain plug washer if possible.
- With warm gearbox, remove drain plug and empty.
- Fill with most of first container, check level after running.
- Maybe do clutch reset procedure.
- Run car for a while; a garage has to do the 2nd fill same day usually, but you could wait a week or so.
- If judder has cleared in the next 50 miles then save 2nd container for fluid replacement in 2 years time, alternatively:
- Drain and fill again with most of second container.

Skimping on the flush might be a false economy if judder is bad, but for slight judder you might get away with just one fluid replacement.  Changing every two years is now recommended, but maybe some cars leave it for 4 years then have to use twice as much by flushing.
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TG
25
Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: 2018 facelift pricing announced
« Last post by TG on January 16, 2018, 04:45:18 PM »
Where did you find out that the 1.5 engined Jazz has a turbo? News to me! I understood it is the same engine as the HRV.
The 2018 North American car of the year - Honda Accord has a turbo version of the 1.5 i4 engine, so it could be used if there's room.  Interestingly this car also has a CVT.
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TG
26
In Car Entertainment / Re: 2014 Jazz Vti head unit
« Last post by TG on January 16, 2018, 04:36:08 PM »
There are a lot of headunits available via the auction sites or Aliexpress if you don't mind fitting it yourself for a few hundred both for the old and new model Jazz.  You will probably need a new fascia, but could fit a touchscreen/DAB/navigation/TPMS/DVR/rear camera unit.  Any city car audio specialist would could also do this in a couple of hours.  Just be careful you get LHD or RHD as required.



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TG 
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Honda Jazz Mk1 2002-2008 / Re: Fitting DRL's
« Last post by TG on January 16, 2018, 04:12:21 PM »
I think the solution, especially for stop/start cars is to follow the 'hybrid' instructions which should keep the lights illuminated even when there is little or no alternator output, this is also the method hinted at in the troubleshooting by connecting to a particular fuse or Acc power feed. 

The Phillips DRL controller is intelligent in order to simplify wiring (up to a point) and in theory can detect when the car is running and switch the DRLs on, trouble is it seems to think this is not all the time such as when the voltage at the battery drops close to it's resting state.  I think rather than follow the instructions by directly connecting to the battery, you should connect to an ignition switched supply instead and set them up to ignore the battery voltage and just switch on directly when they receive power (and off when the sidelight sense wire sees voltage). 

The blue wire sounds like an battery sense override wire, so connecting this to an IG1 switched supply should help.

The original answers are directed to a MK1/GD owner but the same theory applies to the Mk2/GE.   This could be done without an intelligent controller and just a relay instead so the sidelight sense wire cuts the feed to the DRLs.

From a VW forum linked above:
I bench tested my kit before install because some posters were concerned about current draw or flattening batteries. The DRLs power on at about 13.5 volts and are off at 12 volts. If the lamps are forced on at 12V a pair take 0.9 A (12W). At 14.5 volts (alternator charging) current draw is 0.7A (10W). When the DRLs are 'off' the control unit draw is 3mA. This small current should not significantly add to battery drain.
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TG
28
Honda Jazz Mk1 2002-2008 / Re: 08 CVT-7 Jazz Mk1 - Good buy?
« Last post by sparky Paul on January 16, 2018, 03:50:58 PM »
Shall I get the HPI check myself or is it something the dealer did it and will have details of?

Dealers normally do them as a matter of course, and by all means ask to see it. If you ask them if the car has ever been damaged or written off and they confirm that it hasn't, get them to put it in writing at the point of purchase and you should be fine. If you don't ask the question, it can be a very grey area.

I wouldn't worry about doing a check yourself if buying from an established dealer.

Buying private is another matter. Unless the car is only a few hundred pounds, it's worth the few quid it costs doing a check... if only to make sure there is no finance or "logbook loans" outstanding. Logbook loans are not legally enforceable if a car is sold, but that doesn't stop them sending heavies round to put the wind up the new keeper.

If the dealer has the full logbook, it's worth having a look at it, but this applies more to private sales where the seller certainly should have the logbook in their possession.

If the car has ever been an insurance write off, it is clearly declared on the front page. If all is okay, all you should see is one line, "1. Declared new at first registration". Also check the issue date matches the date of last change of owner - if it doesn't, then the logbook has been re-issued to the current owner. They may have lost the original, or they may have handed it to a logbook loan company and applied for a replacement.

Also if I did find corrosion underneath is that a complete deal breaker or just a way to get the price down?

It depends how bad it is. "Seaside cars" can be terrible, and can give major headaches later on, but you never know for sure where they have lived. The place of registration is only that, where it was originally registered.

If corrosion is excessive, it is usually mentioned on an MOT, and brake pipes are normally the first safety-related items that show signs. It's not that uncommon on the rear pipes, but the MOT also mentions a front pipe too.

If you can have a look, or get someone to have a look under the rear, you should expect to see large suspension components with lots of surface rust, and there will be some rust on the body edges at that age, but most of the underbody paint and underseal coating should still be visible. If you see more rust than paint on the body, you have a problem.
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Honda Jazz Mk1 2002-2008 / Re: 08 CVT-7 Jazz Mk1 - Good buy?
« Last post by culzean on January 16, 2018, 03:37:17 PM »
Also if I did find corrosion underneath is that a complete deal breaker or just a way to get the price down?

You will normally find the rear torsion beam member looks a bit tatty and corroded but it is thick material and not a worry,  rear brake pipes where they go onto torsion beam and join up with flexible,  someone at Honda thought it would be a good idea to strip the plastic coating off the last 150 to 200 mm off the steel pipes and that is where they corrode and fail MOT.

I also think that 'stealers' know the Jazz is popular as a second/used car and play that card for all its worth in the knowledge that they are generally very reliable and therefore lower risk.

Yeah, the Jazz does keep its value because they are normally pretty trouble free even when getting long in the tooth.  Also the interior space is equivalent to a class above - they are called a supermini but would shame a car like a Focus for usable interior space. 
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Honda Jazz Mk1 2002-2008 / Re: 08 CVT-7 Jazz Mk1 - Good buy?
« Last post by TheAfterman on January 16, 2018, 03:24:19 PM »
Also if I did find corrosion underneath is that a complete deal breaker or just a way to get the price down?
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