Author Topic: DIY Clutch Replacement - sorted  (Read 22420 times)

Mark7b

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DIY Clutch Replacement - sorted
« on: September 17, 2012, 09:49:58 PM »
Doesn't time fly...!

On Dec 11th last year I enquired whether anyone had done this job themselves, and in particular whether you would need to remove the front sub-frame as the Haynes manual suggests.

Well I finally got round to it with 134k on the clock - it was still juddering slightly on start off, particularly in reverse, but not desperate. The plates themselves were hardly worn - I reckon only 20-25% - but the release bearing, while still sound in itself, had worn a fair groove in the fingers of the diaphragm spring, and it was probably this that was causing the slight judder. I could probably have just bolted it all back together and it would have done another 50k without problem - must say something about Honda's build quality (or rather AP, who manufactured the part as original equipment).

OK. Here's the key info for anyone contemplating having a go at a Jazz clutch replacement themselves:

- You do NOT have to remove or lower the front sub-frame, nor do you have to detach the starter motor, the nearside wheel arch liner or the front bumper.
 - The only tools I had to buy/borrow were a long breaker bar and 32mm socket to get the front hub nuts off and an extra straight socket extension to get at some of the awkward clutch housing bolts behind the engine block. I used a suitable diameter bit of plastic pipe as a clutch alignment tool and then checked it by eye.

Is it easy to do?

- If you have done clutches on other cars, or are comfortable at that level of mechanics, the Jazz is not difficult, but there is a fair amount of stuff to get out of the way before you get at the clutch itself, so it's not quick and you need to be methodical/makes notes/take pictures, etc. to make sure you put everything back as it was. Haynes is quite useful for this.

How much does it cost?
- I got a 3-part clutch kit from my local Motaquip. (it was manufactured by Automotive Products (AP), same as Honda's original equipment) and the new hub nuts from my local Honda dealer. Got change out of 100.

Quick breakdown of how to do it?
Basically you detach everything attached to the gearbox/clutch housing assembly, support the engine/ gearbox with jacks or hoist, then having removed the front/rear/nearside engine mountings, lower the nearside sufficient to unbolt/withdraw the transmission from under the nearside wheel arch. It clears the front subframe and bodywork quite comfortably, and that nice Mr Honda has even provided a nicely balanced support loop on top of the gearbox.

Sequence I followed:
- Loosen the hub nuts before you jack up the car, as it takes a fair bit of welly and a long lever to free them off.
- Jack up the front of the car to give at least 12-15" clearance. I used axle stands and bearers under the front jacking points.
- Take off the front wheels and the plastic tray under the engine compartment.
- Take out the battery & tray, air filter. Unclip and tie back the wiring in the engine bay, together with the clutch slave cylinder/pipework, gearchange linkage, and any clips, straps or brackets that would prevent you detaching the gearbox transmission housing (Follow Haynes for this stage).
- Drain the radiator, unclip the top & bottom hoses from the engine & tie them back.
- Drain the gearbox oil.
- Undo the bottom drop links and the pinch bolts from the front suspension struts on both sides so you can swing each front hub outwards to remove the drive shafts. I took the nearside shaft out completely, but left the driver side one in the front hub, just released the gearbox end, and tied it back.
- Undo the exhaust pipe/manifold bolts.
- Put in jacks underneath or straps from above to support the weight of engine and gearbox separately. I used a jack/spreader under the engine, and a strap to the support bracket on top of the gearbox.
- Ease the bolts attaching the transmission housing to the engine, so they can be easily loosened later. Some are a bit awkward to get at. Make sure you have a good range of sockets/extensions.
- Remove the front, rear and nearside engine mountings. Rear needs open ended spanners.
- After a final check round, gradually and evenly lower the engine transmission assembly, until it is tilted down at the nearside sufficient to clear any obstructions. Make sure both engine and gearbox are independently supported, not 'hanging'
- Undo all the transmission housing bolts, pull the transmission off the engine towards the nearside wheel arch and gradually lower it to the ground.
- Clutch can be unbolted from the engine flywheel, and release bearing slides off gearbox shaft, once you have detached the operating lever.

Reassembly, as they say, is the reversal of the above ....!

A helper would be useful for the lowering and refitting the gearbox/transmission, but if you organise your straps/jacks so the components are fully supported, so you are just manoeuvring rather than taking any weight, then it can be done solo.

Tip: I powerwashed the underneath, wirebrushed all the rusty/corroded components I would need to undo, and sprayed them with WD the day before I started.

DV

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Re: DIY Clutch Replacement - sorted
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2012, 10:04:46 PM »
Nice job!

I had to do the same job myself (alone) but I took the subframe off.

olduser1

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Re: DIY Clutch Replacement - sorted
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2012, 12:10:50 PM »
Really helpfull summary, thanks

John

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Re: DIY Clutch Replacement - sorted
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2012, 08:09:37 PM »
I did not take off the exhaust or drain the radiator.

Can not remember if i dropped the subframe though. Think I did.

Getting the drive shafts out of the hubs was a pain.

Getting the drop link off was also difficult and I had to get a knew drop link.

Getting the gearbox back in was awkward, but then it just slid in.

Mark7b

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Re: DIY Clutch Replacement - sorted
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2012, 02:43:20 PM »
Hi All,

Thanks for the feedback on this.

I basically tried to find a way of doing this without the major hassle of removing the front subframe. Apart from the time and the usual issues of corroded nuts and bolts, I would have needed to take it to a garage after to have the tracking checked/reset.

If you take out/drop one side of the sub-frame you probably won't need to tilt the engine so much, but I reckon it is a worthwhile saving in time and effort to leave the subframe alone, since the only 'extra' work involved is disconnecting the exhaust at the manifold so that when the engine tilts it doesn't strain the exhaust, & ditto the radiator hoses.

Difficult to remove nuts and bolts are always a problem. Sometimes you get lucky, sometimes you don't.
I didn't have any problem with the hub nuts, drive shafts or suspension parts, but one of the clutch housing bolts (ironically - one of the bottom two, the easiest to get at...) was so badly corroded with the aluminium casing that I had to get a replacement bolt, but that all part of the 'fun' of working on old cars and stuff.

Whenever I get a bit frustrated I just go and make a cup of tea, and remind myself that the local dealer wanted over 600 for this job ....!

Mark

dg

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Re: DIY Clutch Replacement - sorted
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2013, 04:15:20 PM »
I had to do the same job myself (alone) but I took the subframe off.

DV, I remember you posted photos of gearbox bearings and was going to replace input shaft ones, did you attempt that? is it possible to DIY? as getting to the clutch and removing gearbox must be 80% of the job. Haynes states it's uber difficult and gives no instructions on this. Anyone else attempted this?
mine gearbox is nosy in neutral and lately is a little bit difficult to engage reverse and 1st gear..


DV

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Re: DIY Clutch Replacement - sorted
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2013, 05:57:46 PM »
Yes I did it.

The first time I thought the thrust bearing was worn, so I replaced the clutch (as a full kit) but it wasn`t, so I ended up getting the gearbox off again and replace the (input shaft) bearings.
It was not difficult to get those (input shaft) bearings out but if you intended to replace all of them you`ll need help and more tools (Honda `recommended` to replace all of them so I did buy them but could not change them myself).
After all only the input shaft bearings were changed and since no more noise (well, after the change I heard the offside rear bearing were noisy so I changed it the next week).
It took me 3 days to do the job alone on my driveway (Friday afternoon to Sunday evening).

I`ve got the Honda workshop manual on a CD, so I was guided all the way.

dg

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Re: DIY Clutch Replacement - sorted
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2013, 06:21:14 PM »
great, thanks! good to know it's doable at least for input shaft ones


xhibit

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Re: DIY Clutch Replacement - sorted
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2015, 12:57:06 PM »
Bumping this thread as need advice on gearbox strip i'm doing for my brother.

I cannot for the life of me get the main and counter shaft out. The manual just says pull it out, but feels as though the countershaft gear is locked into the diff so can't see how it pulls out.

Tried turning and pulling, do the two shafts have to be separated?

I'm taking photos so will return the favour with a DIY

thanks

lexi

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Re: DIY Clutch Replacement - sorted
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2015, 12:47:20 PM »
 
  Providing there are no circlips or other stuff holding shafts, I always use a slide hammer if they wont pull out by hand.  You can make one up. The concept is simple but the effects are miraculous!

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