Author Topic: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.  (Read 3057 times)

GreyJazznz

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We took delivery of the updated 2023 Jazz on Friday (traded the 2021 model). Initial impressions are that the update has made a good car better in some important areas, especially with driveability.

Exterior/appearance:
Some don't like the car's appearance and I doubt the facelift will change their minds. There was nothing wrong with the pre-facelift's looks in my view, and similarly this one is fine too (we went for the same colour again - dark grey).

Interior/equipment:
Changes here include: wireless charger for mobile phone (handy as we have wireless android auto working thanks to this forum), slightly lighter colour leather seats, black accents on the steering wheel and next to the gear selector. Minor changes, but the interior of this car is so well thought out that it did not need much updating.

Performance:
This is where the changes are most noticeable. We went for a 60km drive today (between 80-100km/h). The throttle is more sensitive, i.e., less pedal movement is needed to accelerate. It also seems to hold speed better at inclines. We passed a tractor and sped up  from 40 to 100 very quickly, with engine noise barely audible. These improvements will make the Jazz even more refined and comfortable on longer trips.

Lastly, on my previous Mk4 there were two slight annoyances. The auto brake-hold was unrefined when releasing (it was audible and could be felt, almost like the car slightly lurched). Secondly, the hatch would not always latch properly and the lock release would sometimes be sticky. Both of these issues are resolved with the new model.

I am very happy with the purchase and felt it was worth trading up to the new model. We do get a government rebate in NZ on hybrid and electric cars, so that made the changeover amount very favourable.

I am very passionate about cars and we have owned many (mostly VWs, BMWs, Mercs and Hondas). Issues that others may not notice can easily annoy me and has resulted in the selling of many previous cars, including the Jazz's predecessor, a BMW i3. Given with the Jazz I bought (basically) the same car again after two years is testament to how good these cars are. When I first drove it in 2021 it felt like Honda had returned to the quality engineering of their heyday (in the 1990s) - you could sense this was a well thought-out and well-built car. The facelift has made a well-engineered car just that little bit better in meaningful ways.

Apologies for the long post, but I wanted to share my enthusiasm for this great little car.


Kremmen

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2023, 04:16:02 AM »
My 2022 model releases the brakes very smoothly and I've never had any hatch issues so maybe not unique to the 2023 model. The only change that would interest me would be a dedicated switch to turn off RDMS.
Let's be careful out there !

Jazzik

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2023, 09:52:37 AM »
...and still no height adjustable passenger seat.  >:(
If nothing goes right, go left!

Marco1979

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2023, 10:02:05 AM »
I would be interested whether the high voltage battery is able to deliver more power to the electric motor. In my 2022 model it seems if you want more than a certain amount of power the engine kicks in even when the battery is full. The generator is needed for the electric motor to run at ‘power mode’.

That would certainly be a good update and keep the engine off longer and run more efficiently.

olduser1

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2023, 06:24:32 PM »
Thanks for the update, most useful for the forum. Let's know how you get on after 5k on the clock. Enjoy your new Jazz.

Lincolnshire Rambler

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2023, 06:41:03 PM »
It would interesting to know how many of the drive train improvements are due to software changes . Given the jazz MK arrived in 2020 I don’t think Honda would have changed the petrol engine or the electric drive motor on such a new model.  I believe the arrival of the latest hybrid tech into the jazz followed on from the 2litre units fitted to the bigger CRV . In reality the drive train parts could be the same ones fitted to both the 2 litre units and 1.5 with only gear ratio differences . That’s  what Toyota do in their latest hybrids?

mitchelln

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2023, 09:53:49 AM »
...and still no height adjustable passenger seat.  >:(
Yes, I find this really annoying. My kids are too tall to have it down, but not tall enough to have it up. This seems like ridiculous penny pinching by Honda.

mitchelln

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2023, 09:56:52 AM »
It would interesting to know how many of the drive train improvements are due to software changes . Given the jazz MK arrived in 2020 I don’t think Honda would have changed the petrol engine or the electric drive motor on such a new model.  I believe the arrival of the latest hybrid tech into the jazz followed on from the 2litre units fitted to the bigger CRV . In reality the drive train parts could be the same ones fitted to both the 2 litre units and 1.5 with only gear ratio differences . That’s  what Toyota do in their latest hybrids?
I agree that I doubt they will have changed anything physically on the petrol engine to give the extra power. However, I expect Honda will not make the ECU tweaks available to pre-facelift owners. They never seem to do backward upgrades.
I suspect they will have replaced the electric motors with newer versions. The increase in output is more than I would have thought could be achieved in software.
I'd like the wireless charger, but again, I suspect this won't be made available as a retro fit :(
« Last Edit: March 21, 2023, 10:30:53 AM by mitchelln »

Marco1979

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2023, 04:23:12 PM »
I just found a test video on youtube of the Kiwi RS model (would be similar to our Advance Style version, I think, so the top range one): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xo92BOkrlUU. What surprises me most: it has flappy paddles to adjust regenerative breaking! Hope the European models also get this.

Kremmen

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #9 on: March 31, 2023, 04:31:26 PM »
The same system as the latest Civic
Let's be careful out there !

5thcivic

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #10 on: March 31, 2023, 06:32:21 PM »
They are on the E in 3 stages. I never use them, one pedal mode is hardly different in braking without all the flapping and just so much easier. On the E after braking they default back to min effect so the next slow down you have to start switching again. And still need the brake for full stop.

Kremmen

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2023, 03:54:52 AM »
That sounds annoying if it switches almost off after every use.

At least my preferred B mode stays put.
Let's be careful out there !

Lord Voltermore

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2023, 10:59:02 AM »
My loan car civic had flappy paddles  but I didnt  'play' with them.  TBH although  I know the situations when B mode might be an advantage I dont often come out of D .
Maybe the advantage of constantly being at the optimum  regenerative level  will be worth the regular  flappy paddling, and it will become intuitive, like changing manual gears.   But at present I am basking in the new found luxurious laziness of not having to change gear at all.  :P
  Trust a dog to guard your house  , but not your sandwich

Kremmen

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2023, 03:22:03 PM »
I've not changed gear since about 1977, except for the odd manual pool car when I worked.

They served to reming me why I hated manuals.
Let's be careful out there !

5thcivic

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Re: 2023 Facelifted Jazz - initial impressions. New Zealand model.
« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2023, 06:00:54 PM »
I've tried to use them, and changing gears is a good comparison, with the excellent advantage of not needing to use a clutch, if your driving style is to change down instead of using brake all the time. Just one pedal is so easy and you get used to the delicate touch needed on the throttle, it's much easier to be lazy.

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