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Diagnostics, Tuning, Modifications and Maintenance - all Hondas => DIY Guides => Topic started by: JohnM on June 05, 2010, 05:25:26 AM

Title: Change your battery
Post by: JohnM on June 05, 2010, 05:25:26 AM
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Changing the battery on a Jazz is not as strightforward as you might think. Its not the actual process of changing the battery which is the problem its the electronics on the car that get affected by the lack of power whilst you change it. If you are not happy to take the risk of causing a fault with your power steering (apparently this can happen...) give it to a dealer to do it for you instead.

Problems that can be caused by changing your battery:
- Erratic or high engine idle
- Bad fuel economy
- Heavy power steering
- Windows dont open completely
- Loose your radio presets
- Lock out your radio if it is key coded
- Have to reset your clock

I will try to help you avoid some of these problems with this guide.

Do not be tempted to use a battery operated radio key code saver as Haynes mentions this might deploy the air bags...

   PREP FOR CHANGING THE BATTERY
Leave one door open: In case the central locking triggers when you remove the battery. Turn off interior light and keep the key with you at all times.
Turn off the engine and any devices draining battery power (phone chargers, sat nav etc.)
   
   REMOVING THE OLD BATTERY
Avoid touching the body of the car with tools whilst they are in contact with the battery terminals
Disconnect Negative: Loosen the nut and remove the (-) clamp. Isolate the clamp in a rag.
Unscrew both top nuts: Loosen both of the top nuts on the battery clamp. You only have to do it enough to free the clamp (donít have to remove the nut completely).
Remove clamp: Remove the clamp from the vehicle (with nuts still attached).
Remove Positive: Lift the plastic flap, loosen the nut and remove the (+) clamp. Isolate the clamp in a rag.
Remove Plastic Box: Slide off the plastic box around the battery
Remove the Battery: Remove the battery from the vehicle
   
   FITTING THE NEW BATTERY
Avoid touching the body of the car with tools whilst they are in contact with the battery terminals
Clean Tray and  Plastic Box: Wipe with Tissue should be fine.
Fit Battery: Insert the new battery on to the vehicle
Fit the plastic tray: Refit the plastic tray
Fit Positive: Fit (+) clamp and tighten nut
Refit Clamp: Refit battery retaining clamp and tighten both nuts
Fit Negative: Fit (-) clamp and tighten nut
   
   AFTER CHANGING THE BATTERY
Retrain the ECM !!Important!!
1.   Start the engine and run it at 3000 rpm until engine warm.
2.   Run Engine idle for 5min with all loads turned off.
3.   Lastly drive the car normally for at least 5min.

Im not sure what happens if you dont train the ECM properly, but Haynes states that the training sets the idle speed. Posts on the net suggest high revs at idle and bad fuel economy can result from not following the above procedure. If you take it to Honda to change the battery they get a computer to retrain the ECM, whether this has any real benfit over doing it yourself I dont know.

Reset electric windows: Fully open the window and keep key pressed a few secs.
- Close the window and keep key pressed a few secs. Do this for all windows. This apparent resets the cars perseption of what constitutes an open and closed window for the one click open/close feature.
Clock: Reset the clock
Radio: Reset the channels on the radio

If a fault is reported on your dashboard after changing the battery it is probably the steering. See Chapter 10 Section 9 of Haynes. Sometimes the fault can clear just by driving, if not its fiddly to fix.

If your radio gets locked out because it is key coded you will have to take it to a dealer to unlock it.

Notes:
I have carried out this procedure myself and the information above is a mix of info from the Haynes manual, my own experience and things picked up from the net.

The Jazz Haynes manual can be obatained here: http://www.haynes.co.uk (http://www.haynes.co.uk)
NB: for some weird reason neither Fit or Jazz manuals show up on Haynes.com, so use the co.uk site.

Note: Battery change related sections in Haynes = 5A /2, REF /7 and 10 /19

Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: culzean on June 05, 2010, 02:16:35 PM
If it reassures anyone wanting to change their own battery I have changed the battery on quite a few cars including two GD Jazzes by the following method - 

Just unbolt the old battery terminals* (see note* below), remove old battery and bolt in the new one.

I have never had a problem other than the radio losing its presets and have never knowingly 're-trained' the ECM or ECU. The only precaution I have taken is to leave a couple of doors open in case the doors lock when the power goes off.  The ECU (ECM) on any modern car is designed to 'tune itself in' on a continuous basis as you drive to match the style of your driving and get maximum fuel economy. The engine may run differently for a few miles but will soon be back on song, I have never seen my fuel consumption suffer too much either, in fact at the moment I am getting about 58mpg.

Note * (disconnect negative terminal first - the only reason for this is that if you have one end of the spanner in contact with the positive terminal and you touch any bodywork or engine parts with the other end there will be an almighty bang).
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: JohnM on June 05, 2010, 04:05:41 PM
I took my Honda in to the dealer a few weeks back and they had to retrain the ECM as they disconnected the battery as part of the work they did. Driving home the car felt very different than before handing it in to them. The next day I changed the battery myself and retrained it according to the Haynes procedure, it immediatly drove the same as before I handed it in to them. Even two weeks later it never returned to feeling the same as when I picked it up from the dealer.

It is mentioned on the net that the ECM can retrain itself over the course of a number of days, but from the problems people have reported and what Haynes says it does seem that you can retrain your ECM incorrectly and it wont fix itself eventually just by driving it more.

If you believe Honda nobody but them can retrain an ECM after a battery change. My car is currently in with the dealer for a throttle problem and they are claiming that incorrect ECM training after a battery change caused it.

I guess I didnt make it clear, but the 3 step retraining procedure in my first post is actually copied straight out of the Haynes Honda Jazz manual and Im not just making that up myself. I think that either the idea that you have to retrain it yourself (as implied by Haynes) or the Honda claim are true. Maybe other cars ECMs can be retrained in such a casual way by just driving them, but it doesnt appear so for the Jazz. You could get lucky and just retrain it through random driving, but who wants to take that chance?

As for 58mpg being good, is that urban? I was getting about 52mpg on my urban 12mile run in to central London for the last few years, after battery change and retraining (the Haynes way) I got 57.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: Bonzo on June 05, 2010, 08:18:43 PM
What is wrong with connecting a battery charger to the terminals, prior to removing them, you then have a power source, have used this method on Citroen and Toyota cars, with no problems.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: JazzyB on June 05, 2010, 10:38:09 PM
Whilst I have had no problems changing car batteries on various cars, can those who have had to change their battery on a Jazz let us all know what their experience has been?
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: JohnM on June 06, 2010, 12:39:55 PM
What is wrong with connecting a battery charger to the terminals, prior to removing them, you then have a power source, have used this method on Citroen and Toyota cars, with no problems.

I did a quick net search and it seems (in theory) if you use a trickle charger you should be OK, but dont use a fast charger. Removing the battery whilst keeping a running charger connected at the same time could be a bit fiddly though.

In practice because Haynes claims just using a battery operated radio key code saver may deploy the air bags, I dont know if I would want to risk it.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: culzean on June 06, 2010, 08:12:41 PM
Remember that the voltage on a normal battery charger can be anything up to 18 volts and is not true DC (it is only unidirectional un-smoothed AC) which means the voltage rises and falls like an AC sine wave, but unlike true AC it never goes negative.  This could cause no end of damage to your cars electrics, and is the reason you should never fast charge a battery while it is still connected to your vehicle.

With a trickle charger the voltage will be around 13 volts, not nearly so bad, so may be worth a try.

It is also wise to remember when reading Haynes manuals that a lot of their information seems to be generic, and may not be entirely true for a specific vehicle down to the last technical detail.

All I can say is that I have changed many car batteries, including two Jazz GD 1.4, have never 're-trained' the ECU and never had a minutes problem afterwards.

Remember when Honda they say that no-one but a dealer can re-train the ECU that Honda are the same people that tell you that the tappets on a GD need adjusting every 25K (at about £350 a time!!!both our GD Jazzes have done 3x that mileage without tappet adjustment), that the wheelbearings are fine and no-one but you has ever had a gearbox or steering problem.

The 58mpg is a mixed town and 'A' road commute about 50 miles round trip.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: JohnM on June 07, 2010, 08:00:53 AM
no-one but you has ever had a gearbox or steering problem.

I have never had a gearbox or steering problem *puzzled*

I understand what you are saying about problems Haynes list as possibly not being true across all variations of the same model, but I am guessing many people that might be looking at this board dont have a Haynes manual. If I was one of those people I would rather someone listed what could happen and then it not happen, then to be totally in the dark.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: philwil73 on December 03, 2011, 11:00:45 AM
I have just changed the battery on a 02 Jazz as the old one was dying. I followed the simple steps in the Haynes manual, including retraining the ECM and elec windows etc after reconnecting. Very straightforward, the EPS warning light came on following reconnection, until I set off driving, then it cleared automatically (very glad about that - the procedure for clearing an EPS fault looked a pain).
The steering is fine and engine performance is the same as before. No problems with the radio other than losing presets (but not sure if my radio is "coded" - it is pretty old). Honda quoted £85, I got a battery for £40 and fitted it in five minutes.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: gaz b on December 03, 2011, 01:47:31 PM
Glad to hear that you changed your battery with no problems phil, i have just put a bosch battery on our 02 jazz as the old one was failing fast.... i, however took no chances, i connected one of those portable power packs with the jump leads attached to the terminals on the battery, i removed the old  battery carefully with the connecters firmly attached to the jump leads, i looked into the car and was pleased to see the clock still active on the radio. I lowered the new bosch battery into place and re-attached the terminals and then removed the leads.... i was taking no chances! and everything is in perfect working order with all radio presets etc in place, i have heard some nightmare stories with regards to engine revs, electric windows etc, pleased that none of that happened to you and all is fine...  ;D
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: TonyS on December 03, 2011, 05:26:48 PM
Changed the battery on my wife's 04 Jazz a couple of months ago, did nothing special other than leaving a door open as a precaution.
Everything worked fine after the change and didn't retrain the ECM, performance and mpg same as before and no problems with the windows or radio presets.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: bminverness on September 15, 2014, 03:50:55 PM
Just a big thanks.
Following your instructions-it worked like a dream.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: zzaj on September 15, 2014, 06:52:22 PM
Just a big thanks.
Following your instructions-it worked like a dream.

Whose instructions in particular please?

As I mentioned in another post, my owners handbook has clear instructions on how to change the battery.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: philskynet on November 08, 2014, 07:31:42 AM
just renewed my battery yesterday..no issues other than changing the time on the radio oh and the radio presets and audio ie bass treble  ..car runs exactly the same as it did before the change   :)
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: culzean on November 08, 2014, 09:16:15 AM
just renewed my battery yesterday..no issues other than changing the time on the radio oh and the radio presets and audio ie bass treble  ..car runs exactly the same as it did before the change   :)

Glad you had no problems,  too many scare stories going around about car electrics failing and needing re-training - try to minimize time power is off and you should be OK.  When a garage disconnects the battery to do work on the car it could be off several hours (or days) and is a different case to having power off for less than 1 minute when you are changing a battery.

I have changed the battery on Jazzes and Civics without a moments problem (completely removing the old one and fitting new one without putting 'life-support' electric supply on).  To minimize the time electronics are without power,  prepare the new battery (clean the terminals etc.) and don't disconnect cables off the old one until you have taken the holding strap off etc.  Try to fit the cables back onto the new battery in one go - don't dab them on and off if you can help it. 

Disconnect negative cable (earth) first and re-connect it last - this means that when you have a spanner on the positive terminal and you touch car body or engine with the spanner you won't get a big electrical explosion.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: ginge on November 17, 2014, 06:15:49 PM

The battery on my Jazz died recently recently, used this thread and the Haynes manual and completed the change without any problems.

Thanks to everyone who's taken the time to offer up their advice.

Cheers

Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: stiggysawdust on December 29, 2014, 10:58:06 PM
I changed the battery on my 60 reg 1.4 EX  I-shift Jazz by just undoing the old battery and replacing with the new one.
Needed to reprogram radio presets and clock time. Otherwise absolutely no problem. Car now runs just as sweet as before.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: madasafish on December 30, 2014, 10:05:39 AM
I have changed lots of batteries for the past three decades and never had to reload anything  - ever.

I use a plug-into-the-cigarette-lighter battery powered gismo which keeps all settings.

Costs peanuts - saves a load of hassle.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: VicW on December 30, 2014, 02:37:45 PM
I have changed lots of batteries for the past three decades and never had to reload anything  - ever.
I use a plug-into-the-cigarette-lighter battery powered gismo which keeps all settings.
Costs peanuts - saves a load of hassle.

A good idea.  As used by most workshops etc.

Vic.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: culzean on December 30, 2014, 09:27:50 PM
do you have to put the ignition switch to 'ACC' (first position) because when I try to get power from cigarette lighter socket it is only available with ignition key  turned to first position - so not connected to electrical system unless you do that. .
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: madasafish on December 31, 2014, 10:38:29 AM
yes
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: 007 on December 31, 2014, 01:24:31 PM
 :)  Hello everyone,
I thought I would take the time to register and post my gratitude for the details regarding changing the battery (thanks). The battery on our Jazz (08) was showing signs of age. When I read in the Haynes manual about the possible probs with the power steering I was concerned. Any how after googling and immediately finding this forum I took the decision to just swap the battery myself using the details here and in the Haynes manual. I have replaced numerous batteries before on vehicles, but ones much older with no electronic brains or electric power steering so I had some idea of a few of the steps involved. I am pleased to say that everything is fine... I followed the instructions... just made sure that I had everything to hand in the correct order so that the old battery was disconnected for as short a time as possible before the new one was connected up. I then ran fast idle etc and all is well no warning lights etc, just reset clock and radio stations. Probably saved us some £ as well, rather than taking to dealer. Battery cost me £44.

I would not hesitate to undertake the same again after this experience. Thanks again for your helpful forum and Happy New Year.....
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: Qamelian on August 04, 2020, 05:25:58 PM
I know this topic is old but I thought it relevant to reply within it.

I have recently bought a Honda Jazz 2011 and due to the battery not holding its charge (assumption) I replaced with a new one.

Just took old one out (rusty bolt took forever) and disconnected and replaced with new one. All I had to do was re-enter radio code and reset clock and presets and all is good ... so far.

I did go through the 3000rpm routine followed by a good 10 minute plus drive for the ECM. Can't say wether this was beneficial or needed but no harm to do anyway. Drove similar to before so couldn't really tell any difference. It's a new buy too so haven't really got used to the drive I guess.

Anyway, no troubles so I guess (for now) it was fine to change by myself. We'll see if anything comes up.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: Jocko on August 04, 2020, 06:41:32 PM
I had the battery changed on my 2006 Mk1 and all I had to do was reset the clock (no radio code needed for the Mk1).
Never did anything else (what is the 3,000 rpm routine?) and the car ran has run fine ever since.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: Jocko on August 04, 2020, 07:04:09 PM
I just had a look at my manual, and all it tells me to do after fitting a new battery (or reconnecting the battery) is to wind the driver's window down fully then wind it back up and hold the up button for a full second after it reaches the top. This routine teaches the Auto function.
I didn't do that deliberately but must have done it the first time I opened the window as the Auto works, and I was never aware of it not working.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: Westy36 on August 18, 2020, 04:06:27 PM
Hi,

A good post, thank you.

I've just replaced the battery on our 2013 1.4 Jazz. After reading this post, decided to just replace and ignore the 3000 rpm malarky. Took the precautions of negative off first and back on last, and made sure I had the new battery ready. Really easy quick swap.

Just had to enter radio code and reset clock time. Everything else works exactly as it did.  :)
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: Jazzmeister on August 18, 2020, 10:06:58 PM
Changed the battery on my Mk II and the fuel economy is pretty rubbish, just below 8L/100km, is the IDLE relearn thing needed for the MkII or is it an old wives tale?
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: culzean on August 19, 2020, 08:29:32 AM
Changed the battery on my Mk II and the fuel economy is pretty rubbish, just below 8L/100km, is the IDLE relearn thing needed for the MkII or is it an old wives tale?

Never relearned an ECU on any car,  and changed plenty of batteries,,, All the base parameters required by engine are stored in non-volatile memory safely inside the ECU,  modern ECU are capable of adjusting parameters to suit your driving style and this is stored in volatile memory probably backed up by a capacitor to deal with short power losses,  and after battery change they will relearn ,  but the base parameters were there when car was new and are still there now.  I always prepare everything by taking off battery clamp and moving anything out of the way - slackening off battery terminals ready for the quickest possible changeover, but last few time I have used a home-made cigarette lighter power lead with 20 metres of twin speaker cable and two cigarette lighter plugs - you need a second vehicle or 12 volt battery  ( watch the polarity - centre prong is +,  which is where the stripe on speaker wires comes in ).  Turn ignition to first position on both vehicles to connect cigarette lighter power main car power and you can take all day to change battery if you like.

you can use one cigarette lighter plug and a spare battery to do same job, just need a pair of red and black crocodile clips on other end of the lead.

EDIT - Have attached photo of home made battery change kit - to be honest it does not need to be heavy duty speaker cable as shown, as it is only carrying a few amps ( unless you have heated screens, mirrors, headlights etc turned on in car you are changing battery on... I turn everything off to reduce current required from donor car.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: madasafish on August 19, 2020, 11:59:52 AM
Changed the battery on my Mk II and the fuel economy is pretty rubbish, just below 8L/100km, is the IDLE relearn thing needed for the MkII or is it an old wives tale?

I changed my 2012 Jazz battery this year. Used a battery saver to hold all data.
Drives as it did before.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: FordPrefect8 on August 19, 2020, 12:14:34 PM
Whilst I have had no problems changing car batteries on various cars, can those who have had to change their battery on a Jazz let us all know what their experience has been?

I've done it multiple times for different reasons on two different Jazzes, no problems whatsoever except locked audio unit and wiped settings. Both of them were left for extended periods of time without battery too.
I think it may differ gen to gen as I have noticed people report different things. FWIW the ones I did were 2010 and 2011 1.4 EX Manual models
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: Westy36 on August 19, 2020, 02:58:50 PM
I've only had to change the battery on one other car. My Skoda Octavia at 8yrs old had the original battery die. So, Haynes manual was consulted for the change, and relevant parts highlighted in preperation for relaunch sequence. Low and behold, absolutely no need. As other have said, speed is the key. The car ends up without power for <2mins.

For reference, even though our Jazz has only been with us for a month and 1000 miles, to my ear it was turning over a little slowly. Almost like the starter motor was not giving its all. Well, with the new battery, the starter motor is turning much faster.

So pleased to have done this now, rather than in a few weeks time when the cold weather arrives. £37 well spent.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: Jan0 on July 20, 2021, 10:05:29 PM
I've just changed the battery of my 2014 Jazz.  The car was batteryless for about 3 hours.  After installing the new battery it drove as expected.  I did have to supply the radio code.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: fashionphotography on August 12, 2021, 04:08:26 PM
purchased my 07 . 1.4 jazz a couple of weeks ago. when i picked it up the battery was flat so the trader jump started it.. said the mech working on it must of left something on.. anyway hes bought me a new battery just in case although its been fine ever since.. but the engine light came on after he jump started it but cleared that and fault came up with low voltage that he cleared so no warning light since. i reset the radio window function etc and clock.. steering was iffy for the first few miles but  seams ok now..although im only getting about 32mpg since ive had it.
now the thing is il change the new battery on it soon . im hoping there wont be the engine light coming back on .. and was wondering if the poor mpg maybe down to the ecu not getting retrained? although the car drives and ticks over like a swiss watch ..perfect..
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: fashionphotography on August 13, 2021, 06:40:41 PM
Changed the new Battery today.. reset window radio etc . no warning light thank god lol..  mpg meter is now showing between 18mpg and 28mpg on a run . car drives like new . very strange.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: culzean on August 13, 2021, 07:19:15 PM
Changed the new Battery today.. reset window radio etc . no warning light thank god lol..  mpg meter is now showing between 18mpg and 28mpg on a run . car drives like new . very strange.

A failing battery can cause all sorts of mischief on modern cars,  everything needs electrickery - even the power steering ( about 40 amps on MK1 2002-2008,  and 60 amps on MK2 --> ).  People have cured niggling problems with power steering and many other things by replacing the battery. Of course the battery even more important on later models with auto stop start etc,  and of course battery REALLY important on electric cars.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: zzaj on August 13, 2021, 07:40:20 PM
A failing battery can cause all sorts of mischief on modern cars,  everything needs electrickery - even the power steering ( about 40 amps on MK1 2002-2008,  and 60 amps on MK2 --> ).  People have cured niggling problems with power steering and many other things by replacing the battery. Of course the battery even more important on later models with auto stop start etc,  and of course battery REALLY important on electric cars.

 ;D  ;D 
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: WelshBeauty on August 13, 2021, 09:46:16 PM
I've got a late Series 1 (2008)  GE3 on the VIN
Can I change the battery normally or do I need to use the complicated scenario?
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: culzean on August 14, 2021, 10:25:26 AM
I've got a late Series 1 (2008)  GE3 on the VIN
Can I change the battery normally or do I need to use the complicated scenario?

I believe that the radio code stored in permanent memory in ECU only came in with MK2 ( others on here probably have more info because - see my post below  - I never take power of system when changing batteries ).

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07S5K8JN6/?tag=rv4campers-20

I have had something similar to this for many years ( home made with 20 metre roll of cheap speaker cable ) instead of male to female I have male plugs on both ends ( you can buy the self wiring or soldered plugs ebay / amazon or  local motor factors ).  You do need a second vehicle as a power donor,  alternatively if you have an older 12v battery lying around ( size does not matter so a motorbike battery will do, only need enough current to keep car ECU etc powered up  ) fit crocodile clips to one end of cable. The centre pin of power plug should be positive - I balk at the idea of connecting a battery charger because in the absence of a battery to load up the charger some of them can go up to 18 volts,  which could fry some equipment,  and even  low power charger will be confused,  and anyway to ensure correct polarity  most chargers these days need to sense a decent voltage coming back from battery to charger before they allow voltage to flow from charger to battery,  which is why most new chargers will not charge a flat battery. 

Anyhow, if another vehicle involved make sure whether power on accessory power socket ( AKA cigarette lighter ) with ignition on, if not will need to turn on ignition to position 1 ( accessory ) - if a Honda they normally do not leave power on the socket with ignition off, some german and European cars seem to leave power on socket all the time.   Because power socket not connected to electrics on a Honda you will need to turn on ignition on the car you are replacing battery on ( to allow the socket to connect to car electrical system ).  Using this setup I have never had a problem after changing battery ( but the only problem I ever had anyway was that radio code ).
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: Jocko on August 14, 2021, 12:57:10 PM
Mk1, certainly up to 2006, don't have a coded radio. I was of the understanding they were introduced with the Mk2.
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: nowster on August 14, 2021, 02:52:51 PM
I've got a late Series 1 (2008)  GE3 on the VIN
Can I change the battery normally or do I need to use the complicated scenario?

If I remember correctly, GE is a Mk2 (MY 2009). That does have a coded radio.

The most obvious difference between the Mk1 and the Mk2 is that the Mk1 has a red dot on the J in the word "jazz" on the tailgate (also it has one crease down the centre of the bonnet, vs. two on the Mk2).
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: WelshBeauty on August 14, 2021, 06:22:56 PM
I've got a late Series 1 (2008)  GE3 on the VIN
Can I change the battery normally or do I need to use the complicated scenario?

If I remember correctly, GE is a Mk2 (MY 2009). That does have a coded radio.

The most obvious difference between the Mk1 and the Mk2 is that the Mk1 has a red dot on the J in the word "jazz" on the tailgate (also it has one crease down the centre of the bonnet, vs. two on the Mk2).
I will check for both the points you mentioned .  .  .  .  .  .  maybe I have a early Mk 2 and not a late Mk 1  !!
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: E27006 on August 14, 2021, 06:43:48 PM
I've got a late Series 1 (2008)  GE3 on the VIN
Can I change the battery normally or do I need to use the complicated scenario?

I

The most obvious difference between the Mk1 and the Mk2 is that the Mk1 has a red dot on the J in the word "jazz" on the tailgate.

A dealer toils the colour of the dot is a code for DSi engines and another colour for Vtec engines
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: WelshBeauty on August 14, 2021, 09:38:17 PM
I've got a late Series 1 (2008)  GE3 on the VIN

If I remember correctly, GE is a Mk2 (MY 2009). That does have a coded radio.

The most obvious difference between the Mk1 and the Mk2 is that the Mk1 has a red dot on the J in the word "jazz" on the tailgate (also it has one crease down the centre of the bonnet, vs. two on the Mk2).
OK, reporting back my observations.
1)  My Jazz logo has a red dot  .  .  .  .  .  .  this may signify a Mk 1 or an i-DSI as someone just mentioned.
2)  Bonnet has one crease in the middle .  .  .  .  .  .  which signifies a Mk 1 apparantly.
3)  VIN digits 4, 5 and 6 are GE3   .  .  .  .  .  .  is this Mk 1 or Mk 2?
Title: Re: Change your battery
Post by: WelshBeauty on August 14, 2021, 09:43:17 PM
According to Wikipedia.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Fit_(first_generation)


GE3  is  a  1.3 L L13A i-DSI inline-four 2WD
(2007 Europe 1.4 L model. Made in China)