Author Topic: When or at which mileage hybrid Jazz starts to require a new set of batteries?  (Read 2429 times)

Bonobo

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When or at which mileage an average hybrid Jazz starts to require a new set of batteries?
What are the symptoms showing that the time has come?
And what are the cost-effective ways of dealing with that?

madasafish

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Toyota warrant their hybrid batteries for 10 years - provided they service the cars.
Google  "life of Tesla batteries"

peteo48

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Yes - I did a quick Google on the Prius and got a response of 100,000 to 150,000 miles or between 8 and 10 years. Not cheap to do though so I imagine the Jazz will be similar. One US car repair place was talking about $4,000.

madasafish

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olduser1

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Chaps in the taxi business with high mileage Prius swop out the whole battery unit if the rest of the car costs in. I wouldn't worry about Honda battery's packing in , an earlier Jazz on the forum did 260k before other components gave trouble.

Lord Voltermore

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There are many reports of them lasting for years and mega mileages.   But those are cars in regular use.   

I suspect that when cars with EV batteries  become older some  may  become a second or third choice 'old banger ' (or old sparker'   ;)  ) which  families or businesses  might leave lying idle for long periods .This could quite quickly permanently knacker their batteries.  And you wont be able to recommission them  just by replacing a relatively cheap lead acid battery.

Hopefully this  wont affect me personally. I dont plan to keep it 14 years as I did my Diesel Yaris.  And maybe by then there will  be more specialists able to refurbish EV batteries  for not much more than the costs that ICE  cars   are  prone to, (but not Ev's) such as a new clutch . 

I think old  ICE cars will remain  sought after and hold their value for a while because of their go anywhere, range anxiety advantage ,etc and Hybrids too as a compromise.    By the time new  EV with more efficient batteries become affordable for budget buyers  most Hybrids and  early EV's will have reached the end of their natural service life anyway and start to appear in scrap yards for reasons other than their battery.
  Trust a dog to guard your house  , but not your sandwich

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