Author Topic: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020  (Read 20867 times)

porew

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #30 on: April 17, 2020, 12:15:13 PM »
Some months ago I was told in my local Honda dealership that Crosstar is 2cm higher and that it's achieved by a different setup on the suspension/spring level... the figures in techspecs say 3cm difference, so let's see in reality :)

Pine

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #31 on: April 17, 2020, 01:59:30 PM »
Some months ago I was told in my local Honda dealership that Crosstar is 2cm higher and that it's achieved by a different setup on the suspension/spring level... the figures in techspecs say 3cm difference, so let's see in reality :)
Plus 1cm for the roof rails?

Austriaman

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #32 on: August 15, 2020, 10:37:19 PM »
Had to visit the dealer for a 6 month check up yesterday and picked up the brochure. I don't really see anything that makes me regret deciding to buy one of the last Mk3s of the production run. The body looks fine but it isn't really any different and if the rear looks more like a Mk1 in my opinion so good but nothing terribly exciting. The interior is good and the visibility even more impressive. And the colour schemes? Well I'll let you decide but I think its more a pitch to the young woman market than the duffer market.
The big pull is the way the new Jazz drives. It's powerful, so smooth and seamless. It was the drive that sold me.

John Ratsey

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #33 on: August 16, 2020, 03:56:02 PM »
Plus 1cm for the roof rails?
Seeing this reminded me to get out my tape measure and a spirit level. I measured the highest part of the roof rails on one side to be 1560mm and the other side 1590mm (my old tarmac parking place isn't flat) which gives an average to the top of the rails as 1575mm. The highest part of the roof is in the middle and is about 25mm below the top of the roof rails, ie 1550mm (the rails are about 48mm higher than the sides of the roof). Honda give the Crosstar height as 1556mm so that's evidently the vehicle height excluding the rails.

The big pull is the way the new Jazz drives. It's powerful, so smooth and seamless. It was the drive that sold me.
It's the effortless power under my normal driving conditions that I like. Earlier Jazzes have the power provided the engine is revved but the Mk. 4 will shift off the line with a gentle touch of the accelerator and is also very responsive to slight changes in the accelerator position.

While the brake hold feature is very useful, it leaves me wondering where to put my right foot while waiting to move because, if I touch the accelerator then the vehicle will move.


Kenneve

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #34 on: September 06, 2020, 09:45:26 PM »
Hi Guys
One question that my dealer does not seem to be able to answer is: How does the transmission react when descending a very steep hill, one where in a manual gearbox car, you would maybe change down to 3rd or even 2nd gear to provide engine braking.

You may Say,  in the ĎBí drive position the car would attempt to charge the battery, but what if the battery is already fully charged?  I canít imagine the the braking resistance generated by charging the battery is anything like what would be generated by the engine in a low gear.

As I understand it, the engine directly drives the generator without any gear reduction.

I donít think think I would like to descend Porlock hill or some of the Devon banks, relying entirely of the brakes, or am I just old fashioned?

Jocko

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #35 on: September 06, 2020, 10:05:35 PM »
Someone in another thread said that the motor/generator tries to turn the engine and this provides the engine braking.

I have driven The Pass of the Cattle on several occasions, in an automatic, and never felt the need to come out of Drive.
Modern brakes will cope with any steep descent in the UK without overheating or fading.



Kenneve

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #36 on: September 06, 2020, 10:44:53 PM »
Hi Jocko

From the photos shown, that is certainly the sort of hill Iím talking about.
In my Mk3 I would certainly flick the paddle to change down to a lower gear, aa it would reduce the breaking effort required and of course the unnecessary  wear.
As I understand it , there arenít any paddles on the Mk4, so you must rely entirely on your brakes, which as an old school driver I would not be happy with.
Many years ago, I did experience total brake failure, not something I would like to repeat!

hotweiss

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #37 on: October 03, 2020, 09:12:51 PM »
Hi Guys
One question that my dealer does not seem to be able to answer is: How does the transmission react when descending a very steep hill, one where in a manual gearbox car, you would maybe change down to 3rd or even 2nd gear to provide engine braking.

You may Say,  in the ĎBí drive position the car would attempt to charge the battery, but what if the battery is already fully charged?  I canít imagine the the braking resistance generated by charging the battery is anything like what would be generated by the engine in a low gear.

As I understand it, the engine directly drives the generator without any gear reduction.

I donít think think I would like to descend Porlock hill or some of the Devon banks, relying entirely of the brakes, or am I just old fashioned?

That is what B is for. B is for engine break not battery.

Jocko

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #38 on: October 03, 2020, 09:43:57 PM »
That is what B is for. B is for engine break not battery.
Drive B. Used when driving down a long hill and to increase regenerative braking
From page 27 of the manual.
Regenerative braking is not engine braking and is used to charge the battery.

hotweiss

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #39 on: October 03, 2020, 10:09:01 PM »
OK, I was told that B is used for descending down hills. I had it on my Lexus CT...

Roman

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #40 on: November 03, 2020, 02:04:42 PM »
Actualy Jazz MK4 do use engine braking, after battery full on downhill i hear engine started, as i understand system uses energy that regenerated throught 109 hp motor to spin smaller motor-generator with connected to it gasoline engine, or instead system simple connecting engine to wells using cluth.

Westy36

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #41 on: November 03, 2020, 07:58:39 PM »
I have driven The Pass of the Cattle on several occasions

What a fantastic road that is. Been lucky enough to drive that a 4 times over the years. Unforgettable drive  :D

madasafish

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #42 on: December 26, 2020, 09:34:24 AM »
"Plough lane
I purchased the new Honda Jazz Hybrid a few weeks ago. It is very refined and averages 70mpg but I am going to part-exchange it because of the Road Departure Mitigation System (RDMS). This feature will take control of the steering should you get close to the left-hand side of the road, and move the car to the centre. It might be OK for drunk drivers, or those who cannot concentrate for more than a few seconds, but for me, who drives 80 per cent  of the time in the narrow roads of the Lincolnshire Wolds, this feature is dangerous. I live in a farming community, so when I take a left-hand turn I get close to the edge as, more often than not, a very wide agricultural vehicle will be coming in the opposite direction. It can be turned off, but it has to be done for every trip, as it comes on again each time the car is started. If you forget, you could find yourself face-to-face with a combine harvester. I wrote to Honda asking why every other feature has to be turned on, but this one has to be turned off. No reply. The dealer could not help. I will never buy another car with this feature. ME"


"I had a Jazz Crosstar on test and found the same problem. It's very over-active. Any variation in the road surface would cause it to react. It comes on automatically because it is supposed to be a safety feature. Almost every other car now has something similar, but not as intrusively as on the Jazz. The new Toyota Yaris hybrid has a simple switch on the steering wheel to engage or disengage the RDMS. In the Suzuki Swift Sport 48v hybrid, it stays off once switched off and does not come on again after a restart."
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/cars/advice/honest-john-will-classic-morgan-christmas-heap-trouble/


If true, I will never buy one- same issues.

Kremmen

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #43 on: December 26, 2020, 09:40:01 AM »
I'd just switch it off, same with other things like parts of the auto braking system.

Most Civic 10G owners on Civinfo turn it off and operate the handbrake manually so it doesn't permanently display brake lights at traffic lights and junctions, dazzling drivers behind, but leave brake hold active.
Let's be careful out there!

John Ratsey

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Re: Honda Jazz Mk4 2020
« Reply #44 on: December 31, 2020, 11:25:12 AM »
It took me a while to figure out how to disable the RDMS but it's not difficult to learn how to suppress that invisible pair of hands trying to turn the steering wheel. While it may be a very useful safety measure for someone falling asleep on a motorway it's a nuisance on smaller roads. Perhaps the next generation of vehicles will add some more intelligence to this function.

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