Author Topic: Electric cars  (Read 179262 times)

TiJazz

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2325 on: July 13, 2021, 07:01:24 PM »
The irony is that if Germany invaded France this time, it’d be a liberation from Macron’s authoritarianism.

Jocko

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2326 on: July 15, 2021, 07:43:42 PM »
Honda EV SUV. Honda has confirmed that it will introduce a new electric crossover for the U.S. market. It will arrive in 2023 for the 2024 model year and will use GM's Ultium battery platform as part of a joint agreement between the two automakers.

Jocko

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2327 on: July 15, 2021, 07:57:00 PM »
Caught the tail end of a Bike Show programme on the telly this evening and the guy was raving about the new Harley Davidson Livewire. Now, this guy said he was a dyed in the wool petrol head. He builds engines and tunes engines and has oil and grease in his pores. But he loved the Livewire. Riding it as he liked he only got 100 miles range. With a nighttime thrash, he only managed 76 miles. And it starts at £29,000. However, what he said was, if you can afford it you are not looking for a daily driver or a long-range tourer, though he did some long trips and was surprised how many fast chargers were available. Even in Wales. It is just a beautiful thing to ride.


Foksadure

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2328 on: August 05, 2021, 11:19:29 AM »
Interesting article on last tuesday Guardian :
https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/brief-history-of-motion-9781635573619

Kremmen

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2329 on: August 09, 2021, 07:49:12 AM »
Why has no manufacturer installed car roof solar panels to help keep both Hybrid or single electric batteries topped up ?

My neighbour rarely uses his car, last year he did 900 miles but he has a dash top small solar panel that trickle charges his 55 plate Fiesta and he's never had a problem.
Let's be careful out there!

JimSh

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« Last Edit: August 09, 2021, 08:23:30 AM by JimSh »

ColinB

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2331 on: August 09, 2021, 08:51:30 AM »
Why has no manufacturer installed car roof solar panels to help keep both Hybrid or single electric batteries topped up ?

Just to illustrate the art of the possible (although not really in an everyday practical way):
https://www.bridgestone.com/bwsc/

culzean

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2332 on: August 09, 2021, 09:14:31 AM »
Why has no manufacturer installed car roof solar panels to help keep both Hybrid or single electric batteries topped up ?

My neighbour rarely uses his car, last year he did 900 miles but he has a dash top small solar panel that trickle charges his 55 plate Fiesta and he's never had a problem.

This solar panel produces 1.8watts at 12 volts in full sunshine = 120milli amps ( average car parasitic drain is 25milli amp,  if car has an alarm could be getting on for 100milli-amps) ,  behind the glass of the windscreen that output would drop, when sun moves it drops,  when cloudy it drops, and at night disappears.  so say on an average cloudy UK summer day you may get 50milli amps for 6 hours ( if car was facing south ).  So really all the solar panel is doing is replacing the normal parasitic drain on the battery. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Waterproof-Automotive-Motorcycle-Powersports-Snowmobile/dp/B07DFD3RMS/ref=sr_1_7?dchild=1&keywords=solar+panel+for+cars&qid=1628496091&sr=8-7

The battery in the Fiesta is about 40 amp hour at 12 volt and only used for starting and auxilaries, the .    The average EV battery is now probably 60 to 120 Kilowatt hour - and is uses for everything on the car... You would need a fold-out solar panel 1/4 the size of a tennis court to even make a go at charging the EV battery ( which are often 400 to 600 volts,  maybe 800 volts soon ) - to get 1kw in strong direct sunshine ( 90 degree to panel surface ) needs about 6 to 7  square metres of panel area,  and the output of a panel is a sine wave, rising and dropping quite rapidly as the sun moves,  look at gridwatch and you will see that between October and March in UK the solar input to grid drops alarmingly, as it does on cloudy days.
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

Kremmen

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2333 on: August 09, 2021, 11:10:55 AM »
Ah, right, thanks, just thought I'd ask  :)
Let's be careful out there!

peteo48

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2334 on: August 09, 2021, 12:25:45 PM »
Why has no manufacturer installed car roof solar panels to help keep both Hybrid or single electric batteries topped up ?

My neighbour rarely uses his car, last year he did 900 miles but he has a dash top small solar panel that trickle charges his 55 plate Fiesta and he's never had a problem.

Not directly relevant but our neighbours have spent their holiday money on a 10 year old Fiat Motor Home. Remarkably well equipped but that's by the by. It has solar panels on the roof to trickle charge the vehicles 2 batteries.

culzean

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2335 on: August 09, 2021, 12:26:27 PM »
Caught the tail end of a Bike Show programme on the telly this evening and the guy was raving about the new Harley Davidson Livewire. Now, this guy said he was a dyed in the wool petrol head. He builds engines and tunes engines and has oil and grease in his pores. But he loved the Livewire. Riding it as he liked he only got 100 miles range. With a nighttime thrash, he only managed 76 miles. And it starts at £29,000. However, what he said was, if you can afford it you are not looking for a daily driver or a long-range tourer, though he did some long trips and was surprised how many fast chargers were available. Even in Wales. It is just a beautiful thing to ride.



Quite an expensive toy is that,  I knew a bloke with his own business and a bit of cash that bought a Tesla  ( IIRC a Model S ) after the initial novelty wore off,  it stood in his garage unused and he carried on using his Jag Diesel SUV for his everyday needs.     He may even have bought the Tesla as a 'tax loss' for all I know !
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

Bazzzer

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2336 on: August 10, 2021, 01:13:53 PM »
I saw a "middle bit" of this programme last night, showing Guy Martin travelling from Grimsby to John o Groats and back in an electric car.  I think he said using electric power had cost him over £200, about 50% more than diesel would have cost.  Also, a significant proportion of his charging points were not working as intended (reduced or zero power available).

https://www.channel4.com/programmes/guy-martin-the-worlds-fastest-electric-car

John Ratsey

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2337 on: August 10, 2021, 05:42:56 PM »
Should EVs be zero CO2 rated? I think not if they are charged from the mains. This site estimates CO2 per kWh https://carbonintensity.org.uk/. Divide that number by number of miles per kWh and add about 10% for energy conversion losses. Zero rating should be reserved for vehicles configured to only charge directly from sun and/or wind which could mean that such vehicles don't closck up many miles during winter.

embee

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2338 on: August 10, 2021, 07:24:19 PM »
.....Divide that number by number of miles per kWh and add about 10% for energy conversion losses. ...
That's actually a false truth, if you get my drift.

Almost 50% of our electricity comes from burning gas, and a gas fired power station produces around 550g(eq)CO2/kWh. Any marginal demand increase comes from gas, so if you plug in your EV and all the renewables and nuclear are already being used (which they will be), then it will be charged by a gas power station at 550g/kWh (plus losses, let's say 600g/kWh).
A typical EV does 4mls/kWh, so that's 150g CO2/mile if powered by a gas station (or about 95g/km to make it easy to compare to ICE cars). A similar petrol car might be around 120g/km real world, ballpark 50mpg.

This is also the false truth about domestic gas boilers. Any marginal electricity produced by a gas power station used to heat your water will result in about twice the CO2 of a domestic A rated boiler. If we can get rid of all the gas power stations then we can start phasing out domestic boilers, but until then it's folly. Even an air sourced heat pump with a typical COP will only do just a little better than a domestic boiler for CO2, but will still cost you more to run (domestic electricity typically 4x gas per kWh).

JimSh

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Re: Electric cars
« Reply #2339 on: August 10, 2021, 10:53:10 PM »
Should EVs be zero CO2 rated? I think not if they are charged from the mains. This site estimates CO2 per kWh https://carbonintensity.org.uk/. Divide that number by number of miles per kWh and add about 10% for energy conversion losses. Zero rating should be reserved for vehicles configured to only charge directly from sun and/or wind which could mean that such vehicles don't closck up many miles during winter.
If they are charged from the domestic mains they can be charged overnight at off-peak rates  when there is a low demand for electricity and therefore less demand for backup fossil fuel generation and there will  be less need to close down renewable sources.
There is also the possibility of vehicle to grid charging where vehicles can be used as a storage system for electricity.
https://www.ovoenergy.com/guides/electric-cars/vehicle-to-grid-technology
Zero rating is an incentive to encourage EV ownership. When EVs are more widely adopted the system for vehicle taxation will be changed away from being based on CO2 emissions.

I was surprised by your website at how much difference there was  in the generation mix between regions.

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