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Hi everyone!

I bought a second hand Honda Jazz (2003, good maintenance history) only two weeks ago and I absolutely loved it but now already I am experiencing problems and I'm afraid they will get worse. Because I just got it I am doubting what my next steps will be. Any help in the diagnosis is highly appreciated!

With a cold engine/gearbox, especially in the morning, after I start up the engine I can reverse like normal. When I put it in drive however at first it does nothing and if I wait long enough it starts to creep forward.

From there I have no problems, can drive all day smoothly. Sometimes the first take off (with cold engine/gearbox) can take up to half a minute which of course is unacceptable, (especially when you have reversed out of a parking space and are on the road).   

The other thing is that when you push the throttle during the wait, in an attempt to help it go forward it can go in fail-safe mode (flashing D light). I can then turn ignition off and on to get out of this mode and try again. The failure code registered by the computer is P1885: "Problem in CVT Drive Pulley Speed Sensor Circuit". It would be nice if the problem is indeed caused by this sensor or its circuit, but I have my doubts, because this fault is only displayed in these specific conditions. I cannot obtain a replacement sensor quickly and also don't want to spend more money on something if it is not likely to fix the problem. Especially because I'm not sure what I will do  if a CVT overhaul is required.

My current theory is the following. Because it reverses I assume the reverse brake clutch and start clutch are working. That leaves the forward clutch. If this one is not operating properly when cold the computer will assume that it is applied and when the engine revs it throws the error because the drive pulley sensor value doesn't make sense if the car is not moving. Does that sound plausible?

Does anyone have any suggestions to diagnose it further (without spending a lot of money). Would it maybe help to change the gearbox oil (don't really expect it to). Otherwise I guess checking the forward clutch pressure at a garage would give more information.
Is there an explanation for this to happen in these circumstances only?

Thanks a lot for your help.

Kind regards,
Remco
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Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: Main Beam Assist
« Last post by Downsizer on Today at 04:21:35 PM »
I Had a Qashqai with automatic lights. Easily fooled into thinking that the reflection from a road sign was an oncoming vehicle, applied the main beam, even though half a second later it went off because of the above or a vehicle was approaching.

In some respects automatic lights are a good idea, so at least at night those drivers who try to save electricity by not having their lights on, are overruled by the car's sensors.

I'd guess that the lights sensors are fooled by snow, just like the lane assist etc tools.
Back on topic, I've not noticed a problem on the Jazz with light reflected from road signs.  I don't know why not - could it be something to do with reflected light being polarised?
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Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: Main Beam Assist
« Last post by culzean on Today at 04:03:17 PM »
One of my granddaughters is learning to drive at the moment, she has been taught to keep foot on clutch and brake for short stops. Her dad is tearing his hair out but doesn't want to interfere.

I have never kept my foot on the clutch when stopped, always handbrake on and neutral - maybe that is why I have had such 'good luck' in never having to replace a clutch.  I know people who 'ride the clutch' on hills to save knocking into neutral and handbrake,  but they always blame the ' bad quality' clutch when it fails and they have to spend 's on replacement.  Fitting a new clutch on a rear wheel drive car used to be an easy job, but on front wheel drive it is often an engine out / or at the least taking suspension wishbones off operation.
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Off Topic (Non-Honda) / Re: Autonomous vehicles.
« Last post by culzean on Today at 03:54:54 PM »
https://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2018/01/09/476667.htm

"Companies pursuing automated driving are appealing to cities to build infrastructure that will aid the functioning of their autonomous vehicles. For Aptiv and Lyft’s demo in Las Vegas, traffic lights along the route are equipped with sensors that give the cars extra directive on whether to stop or go"

This article says what I have thought for a long time,  that the roads will have to change to suit AV. Transponders on traffic signals and speed limit signs etc etc - why not just put wires under the road like they have been doing in industry with AV internal logistic trains since early 1980's ...   This is why AV will be limited to certain specific urban areas that have been modified for their needs, and the idea of free roaming AV that can take you from Lands End to John O'Groats remains a distant pipe dream, science fiction that may never become science fact.
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Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: Main Beam Assist
« Last post by Skyrider on Today at 03:52:42 PM »
Not only the shift lever but also the steering wheel, that should put your logic into overdrive. :D
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Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: Main Beam Assist
« Last post by andruec on Today at 03:22:16 PM »
No need to take the hump because you presuppose I am having a go at you CVT drivers with idle stop.
You accused us of being bone idle for keeping the car on the foot brake. The posts you obviously didn't read properly made the reason pretty clear. I think that's a very good reason to get annoyed. It was rude and uncalled for.
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Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: Main Beam Assist
« Last post by andruec on Today at 03:19:26 PM »
Every auto car I have ever driven needed the foot brake to be depressed to start it (even in park) this is because torque converter never disconnects  drive completely and will creep at tickover and surge forward if throttle is pressed while starting, it is a double safety in case 'park' locking pin broken or not engaged because mechanically seized.  So it follows that footbrake is used to hold car in traffic if park not engaged. Idle stop just complicates things on an auto, meaning that interlocks have to be provided to cover a variety of situation that would not normally happen.

That explains why it's a good idea to have a brake engaged when an auto car is stopped with the engine running, but not why it has to be the footbrake. You would get the same result by applying the parking brake, and arguably that would be safer because it avoids the possibility of the car moving unexpectedly if the driver's foot slips off the pedal. Back to Rule 114 again that specifically requires the use of the parking brake.
I think the answer lies in the old KISS adage - Keep It Simple Stupid.  By tying the auto-stop to the brake pedal alone on the CVT keeps the circuitry as simple as possible.  Simplicity leads to reliability.
..but it's also tied to the gear lever (which is basically pointless) so that's more complexity than is needed.
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Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: Main Beam Assist
« Last post by sparky Paul on Today at 02:50:24 PM »
Many newer drivers also keep the clutch depressed and the car in first ready for a quick getaway - I have to say I'd be uncomfortable doing that.

Me too. Apart from the danger of slipping off the clutch, as unlikely as it is, think of the poor clutch release bearing and how much work is involved to change it!


But I do struggle with the idea that brake lights blind people or cause discomfort. I never even thought about the issue until I entered discussions on this forum.

I wouldn't go as far as discomfort, but the LED brake lights on some modern cars really are quite dazzling when they are only a few feet away. If I'm sat at traffic lights at night, in rain, I now sometimes find myself putting my hand up to blot out the brake lights so I can see when the lights start changing.
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Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: Main Beam Assist
« Last post by Skyrider on Today at 02:18:25 PM »
There is no comparison between the way manual and automatic cars are driven and to put them into a lazy driver contest is not valid. A lazy manual transmission driver will sit in traffic with foot on clutch and brake or hold their car on an incline with the clutch. Auto transmissions by definition should be left to do their thing, left in drive until you want to park it or go backwards. The extent of this difference may be indicated by the fact that an auto licence holder is not permitted to drive a manual car. I have driven both manual and automatic cars in most of Europe, Australia, The USA and Canada. The UK is the only country where I have seen this type of discussion or such strong feelings about brake lights. Maybe some people should get off our little island and see how the rest of the world manages relaxed, non competitive driving.

Some good points here. Since I got my CVT I've been a bit sensitive about it but doing my own observations, it seems clear that keeping your foot on the footbrake is common practice even in cars with manual transmissions. Many newer drivers also keep the clutch depressed and the car in first ready for a quick getaway - I have to say I'd be uncomfortable doing that.

But I do struggle with the idea that brake lights blind people or cause discomfort. I never even thought about the issue until I entered discussions on this forum.

One of my granddaughters is learning to drive at the moment, she has been taught to keep foot on clutch and brake for short stops. Her dad is tearing his hair out but doesn't want to interfere.
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Honda Jazz Mk3 2015 - / Re: Main Beam Assist
« Last post by Skyrider on Today at 02:14:14 PM »
In my experience a city is a city when it comes to traffic, the bits in between the cities are worse in the southern half of the UK. Fortunately I live in a light traffic area well to the north. In my opinion the drivers in the USA are the most laid back, this may be due to strict law enforcement and road rage requiring careful thought when many people carry guns. You get the people who see the roads as a competitive area, race track, or war zone, or are just incompetant anywhere in the world. Driving standards in the UK (which used to be among the best) are now suffering from drivers who learned to drive in countries with poor driving standards, no UK licence, and lack of road policing and enforcement. Some older drivers have difficulty coming to terms with the deteriorating standards of road use.
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