Author Topic: Have you ever seen a happy jogger?  (Read 3946 times)

sparky Paul

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Re: Have you ever seen a happy jogger?
« Reply #15 on: May 10, 2018, 06:21:57 PM »
Good luck with the run, very worthy cause.

So I prescribe per day:

  • One slice of carrot cake
  • One piece of pumpkin pie
  • Raspberry Trifle
  • A Strawberry Fool
  • A bag of chips

Sorry, I don't think you're allowed chips, NHS guidance specifically excludes taters from your 5 a day. Spoilsports.  >:(

Walking does it for me, particularly places motor vehicles cannot go.

culzean

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Re: Have you ever seen a happy jogger?
« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2018, 08:06:09 AM »
I saw a list a few years ago of overall fitness that various forms of exercise produced. Cyclists and runners were quite low down as they only use certain muscles, Nordic skiers came out on top because they use pretty much every muscle in their body.  I know a few ex runners with knackered joints because of high impact nature of running, personally I will stick with hill walking and my (indoors) cross trainer,  I may not get many endorphins but hopefully I won't get new knees and hips or pneumonia. either. Good luck with the GREAT North run RF.

Various studies have found that NHS guidelines of 150 mins of moderate exercise are not real good. 10 minutes every other day or even twice a week of fast exercise like x-trainer will get you much fitter.  Any exercise is good but moderate exercise will get you to a level and then no further.   NHS guidelines on low fat are also under question these days, low fat foods may causing health problems including diabetes, the human brain needs fat and cholesterol to function.  Polar explorers pretty much live on clarified butter fat for up to six months and have extremely low cholesterol levels and good balance of good and bad types.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2018, 09:28:44 AM by culzean »
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

ColinB

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Re: Have you ever seen a happy jogger?
« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2018, 08:29:41 AM »
If you  want to sponsor me  for the Great North Run by the way, feel free. I would really appreciate it. I am running for Macmillan Cancer Support in memory of my Dad, who was taken too young by cancer at 66, having run the London Marathon during his battle.

Many of us have been touched by the big C in one way or another, and the Macmillan Team do a great job. So I've just chipped in. Good luck !

madasafish

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Re: Have you ever seen a happy jogger?
« Reply #18 on: May 11, 2018, 09:51:29 AM »
I am nearly 71. From age 17 to 21 and 31 to 65 I ran (like jogging but faster)  regularly. Not marathons but half marathons. Only gave up as my hamstrings were revolting. I now walk approx 10k paces a  day - on grass cutting days up to 23k. I also do 5 daily sessions of 15-25 minutes  and 2 sessions of 1 hour of yoga for flexibility and strength and to counter the effects of sciatica I had 4-5 years ago . (It works - I no longer suffer from it).

I know lots of fit people who continue exercising well into their 80s.. and lots who stopped in their 50s (if they even started) - the majority of the unfit ones tend to clog up doctors and NHS wards with the various ailments of old age - heart, strokes, overweight etc.  And used to know  lots of dead ones - mainly men who had heart attacks in their 50-60s..  or cancer etc.

All very well to scoff at those who exercise but the secret to muscle tone - especially heart and lungs is to exercise them to the point at which they are stretched to capacity - and then  not  to overdo it. It is no accident teh countries with no history of exercise but a tendency to abuse alcohol have the lowest life expectancy in the UK, the worst death rates from heart disease and the worst numbers of obese and medically unfit adults..and cities where in parts life expectancy is lower than Afghanistan..

Of course, I may drop dead tomorrow with a stroke - but until that happens I shall enjoy  # gardening, walking, yoga and beekeeping (the latter involves lifting and moving boxes up to 40Kg in weight and being close to nature.) Unsurprisingly elderly beekeepers tend to live long and contented lives.. (I hope :-X  )

Edit #  and do occasional car maintenance : I can still grovel under a car..


The other secret is to maintain a healthy eating style, avoid burned meat (no well done steaks)  and too much rich or fatty foods...and limit spicy foods. The prevalence of prostrate cancer seems to suggest that a rich diet tends to increase its risk.. (My BIL and brother both suffered - we tend to eat more simple food and eat a LOT of fruit and veg)
« Last Edit: May 11, 2018, 09:57:51 AM by madasafish »

richardfrost

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Re: Have you ever seen a happy jogger?
« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2018, 11:07:40 AM »
If you  want to sponsor me  for the Great North Run by the way, feel free. I would really appreciate it. I am running for Macmillan Cancer Support in memory of my Dad, who was taken too young by cancer at 66, having run the London Marathon during his battle.

Many of us have been touched by the big C in one way or another, and the Macmillan Team do a great job. So I've just chipped in. Good luck !

Thanks a lot ColinB. I raised over 1100 when I ran my first 10K in 2016. Hoping to get close to that with my first Half Marathon this year. Will be starting my fundraising in earnest soon.

A runner with good style will use an awful lot of muscles all across their body. The reason I said running is not good for weight loss is, for me, it makes me bloody hungry and crave the wrong kind of foods. When I was training for the 10K I was also aiming to lose weight. I lost 4 stone through a combination of sensible choices, portion size monitoring and recording what I ate. I then balanced this against exercise calorie tracking. My exercise back then was mostly walking 10,000 steps per day minimum and at least 4 one hour plus gym sessions a week involving weight training and aerobic machines, such as elliptical / cross trainer and then treadmill.

I have two fused vertebrae in my back from a parachute accident in my 20s. I suffered from a 'bad back' and nothing could cure it, until I started working out at the gym and strengthened my core - weighted sit ups and lower back extensions. I now have no back issues unless I do something stupid.

I am a firm believer now that we need to look after our own health and fitness, in whatever way suits us, and not just expect the NHS to rock up with pills and miracle cures. We all seem to have a range of doing that here and that is great. If there's one thing I hate it is a bore going on about how their particular sport or fitness regime is the best and everyone should do it. What works for me is gym, walking and running, at the moment.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2018, 11:13:04 AM by richardfrost »

auntyneddy

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Re: Have you ever seen a happy jogger?
« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2018, 11:52:15 AM »
I used to insist on walking my beat. I was always in bother for doing so. Even in my days fire brigade policing was the norm. My Sub Div Commander used to go spare if I could not respond immediately, despite the fact I was a village bobby. His philosophy was immediate response. He had done most of his policing in a large town and had no concept of village policing. We were described as an unnecessary luxury. Here we are many years down the line and the public is screaming for community policing. All these specialist depts have drained the supply of  woodentops as we were described BUT whenever CID wanted information who did they ask?
HMRC had followed a male from India through South Africa only to lose him on my patch. Of course they didn't want to tell my Wife ( the unpaid assistant) anything,   telling them unless they identified themselves they would get zilch. Well, after being sensible She was able to tell HRMC exactly where their person was.
Unfortunately policing has left me with many health problems but do I keep on at my Dr?  No because I know that little can be done. It does really tick me off when I know of people who are always down the Drs because they cannot be bothered to listen. I have pressure on my Femoral nerve caused by the aperture in the spine gradually closing. Operation yes BUT how many would chance a surgeon no matter how good chiseling a piece out of their spine alongside their spinal cord. No guarantee of success but the likley hood of incontinence. The bottom of my spine is affected by arthritis and so is my left arm and side. Yes I would like to be ale to walk, swim, run and cycle BUT no chance, I just have to put up with it, not always graciously Moany old git.

peteo48

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Re: Have you ever seen a happy jogger?
« Reply #21 on: May 11, 2018, 04:10:10 PM »

The other secret is to maintain a healthy eating style, avoid burned meat (no well done steaks)  and too much rich or fatty foods...and limit spicy foods. The prevalence of prostrate cancer seems to suggest that a rich diet tends to increase its risk.. (My BIL and brother both suffered - we tend to eat more simple food and eat a LOT of fruit and veg)

I was diagnosed with prostate cancer in December 2015. A course of radiotherapy and hormone treatment back in 2016 seems to be working thus far (got another PSA check and appointment with the oncologist next month). I did a bit of research around the subject and got a book by the acknowledged world expert in the disease Professor Patrick Walsh from Baltimore. In this book he outlines how prostate cancer is virtually unknown in China and some other far eastern countries. When people of that ethnic group move over to the west, especially the USA, the graph shoots up. A diet with minimal or no dairy seems to be significant here along with red meat etc.

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