Author Topic: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz  (Read 6306 times)

John Ratsey

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2177
  • Country: gb
  • My Honda: 2020 Jazz Crosstar
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #105 on: August 13, 2021, 10:23:55 PM »
Maybe the press's idea of "fun to drive" is something where you have to pay close attention or you'll end up in a ditch or worse. I would call the Mk 4 Jazz "easy to drive".

Expatman

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 358
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #106 on: August 13, 2021, 10:37:16 PM »
Donít you think that driving has changed dramatically over the past 50 years but road testers havenít? Most road tests are concerned about acceleration, cornering at the limit and 'fun'. Whilst for the vast majority of the time we are all in traffic and cars are now so advanced that they all (or virtually all) have good handling and reasonable acceleration and we are more concerned with comfort and meeting our needs in terms of economy, looks, family space and in-car entertainment. I remember the fun of just going for a drive but those days are long gone, now for most a car is another white good. Sad really

Kremmen

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1073
  • Country: england
  • Civinfo interloper
  • Fuel economy:
  • My Honda: MY22 Jazz EX
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #107 on: August 14, 2021, 05:10:58 AM »
Yep, my driving style has changed dramatically and when I took the test drive I didn't try to see how fast it was or how quick it got there. I just used my typical laid back style and I was very pleasantly surprised by how the Jazz performed.

I do agree that the tech can be a pain though, I wonder what NCAP's next driving hindrance will be.
Let's be careful out there!

Steve_M

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 237
  • Country: gb
  • My Honda: 2021 Jazz e:HEV SR
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #108 on: August 14, 2021, 09:43:47 AM »
Yep, my driving style has changed dramatically and when I took the test drive I didn't try to see how fast it was or how quick it got there. I just used my typical laid back style and I was very pleasantly surprised by how the Jazz performed.

I do agree that the tech can be a pain though, I wonder what NCAP's next driving hindrance will be.

Many of the up coming requirements will come from the next revision of the General Safety Regulation.

https://www.europarl.europa.eu/cmsdata/155060/PPT%20General%20Safety%20Regulation.pdf

Many of these items, Honda are already applying, but some basically become mandatory fitment to all newly type approved vehicles.

ColinS

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 686
  • Country: england
  • My Honda: 2018 HR-V EX-Navi CVT
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #109 on: August 14, 2021, 11:08:14 AM »
Many of the up coming requirements will come from the next revision of the General Safety Regulation.

https://www.europarl.europa.eu/cmsdata/155060/PPT%20General%20Safety%20Regulation.pdf

Many of these items, Honda are already applying, but some basically become mandatory fitment to all newly type approved vehicles.

Strictly speaking that looks like EU regulations but I have no doubt the UK will also comply as it make sense.  It looks like Honda are well ahead of the game though.

culzean

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 7235
  • Country: england
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #110 on: August 14, 2021, 11:15:24 AM »
Many of the up coming requirements will come from the next revision of the General Safety Regulation.

https://www.europarl.europa.eu/cmsdata/155060/PPT%20General%20Safety%20Regulation.pdf

Many of these items, Honda are already applying, but some basically become mandatory fitment to all newly type approved vehicles.

Strictly speaking that looks like EU regulations but I have no doubt the UK will also comply as it make sense.  It looks like Honda are well ahead of the game though.

I think all these complex tech regulations dreamed up by the EU are just 'non-tariff barriers' - a lot more insidious and hidden than the overt tariffs.  Non tariff barriers  are normally technical regs that mean you cannot sell your goods in a country ( in this case the EU ) without meeting the standards,  and keep raising the standards ( AKA moving the goalposts ) to limit imports.
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

R2D3

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 18
  • Country: gb
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #111 on: August 14, 2021, 01:44:16 PM »
Think you are missing the point.  The regulations apply to EU cars exactly the same.  Nothing to do with tariff restrictions.

culzean

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 7235
  • Country: england
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #112 on: August 14, 2021, 02:22:03 PM »
Think you are missing the point.  The regulations apply to EU cars exactly the same.  Nothing to do with tariff restrictions.

I never said tariffs, I said non-tariff barriers, which can be a lot sneakier than tariffs.

Well the EU the motor industry is hand in glove with regulators ( hence the blind eye that was turned on diesel emissions until USA blew the whistle and 'dieselgate' blew the gaff ). The regulators know the tech that their car industry ready to implement and makes regulations for it, the EU ( read German )  car industry write the regulations and EU commission rubber stamp them.  The EU car makers ready to go because they wrote the regulations, the non EU car makers normally take a while to catch up and in the meantime have problems selling cars in EU,  and when the non EU competition has caught up, time for some more regulations...

The EU has always used non-tarrif barriers, a lot of them technical to try to limit imports.

https://ustr.gov/trade-agreements/free-trade-agreements/transatlantic-trade-and-investment-partnership-t-tip/t-tip-2
« Last Edit: August 14, 2021, 02:24:38 PM by culzean »
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

Autobahn

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 14
  • Country: de
  • My Honda: Jazz e:HEV Executive
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #113 on: September 15, 2021, 08:02:53 AM »
After 1000 miles I still like my Jazz MK4 Ex. I drive it mostly on motorways, about 140 miles per day, except Sat/Sun. My Jazz isn't as loud as stated in some Youtube tests and it's fun to drive. Although I could drive at maximum speed on our German motorways I prefer the "old people" style with about 50 to 60 miles per hour with adaptive cruise control and assisted steering on. All in all I get a fuel consumption of 60 mpg on motorways at 50 to 60 mph.

Driving in the city is also very relaxing. I like the silence while waiting at traffic lights, too. It's my first automatic car and I like it to cruise smoothly through the streets. Twice I tried to use the clutch pedal, which was a surprise for me and the cars behind me :-) But I am getting more and more familiar with the new two pedal world.

Kremmen

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1073
  • Country: england
  • Civinfo interloper
  • Fuel economy:
  • My Honda: MY22 Jazz EX
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #114 on: September 15, 2021, 08:30:42 AM »
I always say to people going to a 2 pedal from a 3 pedal to take your left shoe off. It helps as a reminder that you don't need your left foot.

However, I see frequent posts from people who use both feet on autos and it sends a shiver as unless you are 100% confident then it can aid wrong pedal crashes and permanent brake lights not to mention premature pad wear.
Let's be careful out there!

Autobahn

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 14
  • Country: de
  • My Honda: Jazz e:HEV Executive
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #115 on: September 15, 2021, 09:58:22 AM »
I always say to people going to a 2 pedal from a 3 pedal to take your left shoe off. It helps as a reminder that you don't need your left foot.

However, I see frequent posts from people who use both feet on autos and it sends a shiver as unless you are 100% confident then it can aid wrong pedal crashes and permanent brake lights not to mention premature pad wear.

I went further after your post: I cut my whole left leg off to save precious time. Well, it works! I really don't need my left foot anymore. Thanks a lot ;->

culzean

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 7235
  • Country: england
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #116 on: September 15, 2021, 02:00:37 PM »
I always say to people going to a 2 pedal from a 3 pedal to take your left shoe off. It helps as a reminder that you don't need your left foot.

However, I see frequent posts from people who use both feet on autos and it sends a shiver as unless you are 100% confident then it can aid wrong pedal crashes and permanent brake lights not to mention premature pad wear.

I never have a problem changing between auto and manual vehicles, and have never used left foot braking, it is dangerous, the best your left foot can do is bash your nose on windscreen.  You should never want to brake and accelerate at same time.
Some people will only consider you an expert if they agree with your point of view or advice,  when you give them advice they don't like they consider you an idiot

richardfrost

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1050
  • Country: england
  • My Honda: Black 2005 1.4 SE
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #117 on: September 15, 2021, 02:17:51 PM »
You should never want to brake and accelerate at same time.
Unless you're doing doughnuts in a go kart.

Kremmen

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1073
  • Country: england
  • Civinfo interloper
  • Fuel economy:
  • My Honda: MY22 Jazz EX
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #118 on: September 15, 2021, 02:28:39 PM »
I never have a problem changing between auto and manual vehicles, and have never used left foot braking, it is dangerous, the best your left foot can do is bash your nose on windscreen.  You should never want to brake and accelerate at same time.

I fully agree. Here is one guy who just won't be told that it's dangerous and here is his theory:

Quote
It should immediately be apparent that left foot braking has far more potential for benefit in an automatic car than in a manual, as having one foot do nothing while another does two things is at the very least inefficient.

Left braking makes sense in an automatic, and depending on who you talk to, may even be safer. Mistakenly pressing the wrong pedal in a given situation is responsible for a surprising number of accidents Ė and is believed to be hugely underreported as instances are often bundled under driver error along with everything else.

Having one foot on each pedal would drastically reduce the likelihood of this happening as you have a constant feel of where each pedal is, with no need to find it again hastily during a developing situation.

There is also a slight benefit in the reduction in time it takes get a foot onto the brake pedal in an emergency. Those saved fractions of a second it takes to move your right foot from the accelerator to the brake could make all the difference.

He just won't be told !
« Last Edit: September 15, 2021, 02:32:05 PM by Kremmen »
Let's be careful out there!

zzaj

  • Approved Member
  • *
  • Posts: 806
  • Country: gb
  • My Honda: 2014 1.4 EX CVT Orchid White
Re: Enjoyment of driving the Mk4 Jazz
« Reply #119 on: September 15, 2021, 05:42:00 PM »
My wife recently did a double doughnut in reverse in an automatic.

She didn't mean to!

Women!  ;)

Tags:
 

anything
Back to top