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91
Honda Jazz Mk2 2008-2015 / Re: Battery Life?
« Last post by peteo48 on June 21, 2017, 11:35:33 AM »
Batteries do not like hot weather,  a battery in a hot country may last about 2 years,  we are pretty lucky in UK

I can confirm this having lived in Kuwait for three years. Recent temperatures were a cool day for a Kuwait summer 40C being normal !
Under bonnet temperatures were very high and battery failure was a way of life, you always carried jump leads, not just for your own use but in case someone else needed help. It was not unusual to see two lots of jump leads joined together where access was difficult !
Battery failure was usually instantaneous with no warning of impending failure and in the American car that most people drove the batteries were enormous.

Vic.

Vic.

Not strictly relevant but this seems to apply to Electric Cars as well. I've done some research into the Nissan Leaf as a possible next car and battery degradation has been a significant problem, regardless of mileage, in the hotter states in the USA. In the UK, on the other hand, the batteries have held up very well. There's a Leaf taxi in Cornwall that, after 5 years and 170,000 miles still had 80% of it's battery capacity.
92
Honda Jazz Mk2 2008-2015 / Re: Battery Life?
« Last post by auntyneddy on June 21, 2017, 11:15:39 AM »
Our Jazz was registered in October 2010 so, coming up for 7 yrs. The battery (original as it had the date 10/10/10 on the side) appeared to be OK. I kept an eye on the indicator which always showed OK. Then recently, while working on a back door for about an hour, ignoring all the warnings, I ended up with a flat battery. AA started it OK and the battery appeared to be fine BUT as it had failed once with comparatively little drain I decided on a replacement.
I found a YUASA locally, they claim it has a 4 yr warranty for 55.
When I started the car after fitting the new battery, I realised I had been living on borrowed time. It started instantly, no turning over several times before firing.
Of course being s*ds law the old battery might have gone on for several more months, it is doubtful it could have coped with the next winter. Despite all appearing to be in order, one must accept that batteries don't live for ever.
93
Honda Jazz Mk1 2002-2008 / Re: Trading up.
« Last post by Jocko on June 21, 2017, 08:29:32 AM »
Never even considered it. I no longer do my own work on my cars (parted with my tools many years ago) and my son-in-law is too busy with his golf and paying "homers" to waste time his time on my car. There was a time I would have been happy to consider such a job but sadly, no more.
94
Honda Jazz Mk2 2008-2015 / Re: Climate control problem
« Last post by culzean on June 21, 2017, 08:25:05 AM »
The minute they change anything from manual to automatic it complicates things (and more complication = more s).
These days there are more electric motors in a car than you can imagine,  everything from wing mirrors to climate control and seat adjustment.

Only thing electrical I have ever had go wrong with cars with manual aircon / heating was the fan speed resistor pack,  costs about a tenner, and half an hour to replace - and no need to rip the complete dash assembly out of the car to get to it - and I do miss the simple rotating knobs for fan speed and temperature rather than pressing little buttons - and then the system does stuff you don't want it to anyway.

Wife had a 4 year old Fiat and the heater matrix sprung a leak (god bless Fiat quality control) - that cost nearly 450 quid over 15 years ago - most of cost was around 8 hours labour to get complete dash out to access it - I normally fix cars but wasn't up to that job..
95
Honda Jazz Mk1 2002-2008 / Re: Trading up.
« Last post by olduser1 on June 21, 2017, 07:33:12 AM »
Have you assessed the time/cost of installing a/c from a breaker?
96
Honda Jazz Mk2 2008-2015 / Re: Climate control problem
« Last post by Ozzie on June 21, 2017, 04:48:26 AM »
The car is realistically only worth 2000 now so I will keep it going for the time being. If I can't cope without a heater I will buy another car and keep this one as a spare, I am determined to run it to the end.
97
Honda Jazz Mk2 2008-2015 / Re: Climate control problem
« Last post by TG on June 20, 2017, 10:50:52 PM »
The motor looks quite easy but the flap is completely buried inside. so that's a bugger.  I hope a resolution presents itself.
--
TG
98
Honda Jazz Mk2 2008-2015 / Re: Battery Life?
« Last post by VicW on June 20, 2017, 04:08:35 PM »
Batteries do not like hot weather,  a battery in a hot country may last about 2 years,  we are pretty lucky in UK

I can confirm this having lived in Kuwait for three years. Recent temperatures were a cool day for a Kuwait summer 40C being normal !
Under bonnet temperatures were very high and battery failure was a way of life, you always carried jump leads, not just for your own use but in case someone else needed help. It was not unusual to see two lots of jump leads joined together where access was difficult !
Battery failure was usually instantaneous with no warning of impending failure and in the American car that most people drove the batteries were enormous.

Vic.

Vic.
99
Honda Jazz Mk2 2008-2015 / Re: Battery Life?
« Last post by Jocko on June 20, 2017, 03:47:37 PM »
I was a radio officer in the Merchant Navy and we depended on batteries for our emergency system. In fact, the first ship I served on had two banks of Lead Acid batteries, for Working and Standby, with one set on charge at any time. For my ticket I had to study battery construction, maintenance and chemistry, for about 3 months of the course. Every port saw a mornings maintenance work. Compared to that car batteries are a dawdle. And so much more advanced now. The worst that can happen is you need a jump start. Better that than the skipper wanting to send an SOS and you have no transmitter!
100
Honda Jazz Mk2 2008-2015 / Re: Battery Life?
« Last post by culzean on June 20, 2017, 03:22:01 PM »
I would have hoped that garage would have done a basic check on charging voltage,  Alternators used to have one diode in the diode pack fail (alternator produces AC and this needs to be rectified with a diode pack to change it to  DC for car electrics) and it would mean a drop of around half a volt on output,  Many garages missed it because they thought 13.5 volts was OK,  but it needs to be 13.8 to 14.2 -  the result was the battery gradually lost power, it would be recharged with a charger and then gradually lost power again because charging voltage was too low. 

A quick check with a voltmeter across battery terminals with engine running is all it needs to check voltage is in the 13.8 to 14.2 (or a bit higher) range as above,  after being allowed to stand for about an hour after charging voltage should ideally be about 12.6 volts in a happy battery.  You can tell state of charge of a battery by terminal voltage (after allowing battery to stand for a while - for chemistry to 'settle down').

Batteries do not like hot weather,  a battery in a hot country may last about 2 years,  we are pretty lucky in UK

http://www.mmbalmainauto.com.au/PDF/State_of_charge_12_volt_batteries.pdf
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